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In print, on the web, infographics, and people are talking. Talking about you and your work.

  • Instant Film. Complex Chemistry: The Science Behind Polaroid Film

    Vintage. Old school. Retro. Whatever you call it, there’s a noticeable uptick in nostalgic items these days. When you combine this trend with today’s obsession with instant gratification and we get a climate that is ideal for the comeback of the Polaroid instant camera. Although the current models of Polaroids are cuter than the bulky … Continue reading Instant Film. Complex Chemistry: The Science Behind Polaroid Film

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  • Use analytical skills to develop relationships

    When we are children, our relationships are based around fun. As we get older, we want to share more of our lives and experiences with our friends. Late night truth or dares when you conspiratorially got your two friends that liked each other to kiss turns into a secret you keep from your parents and … Continue reading Use analytical skills to develop relationships

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  • The Doomsday Clock: What Is It, and Is All Hope Really Lost?

    For the first time, the Doomsday Clock moved 30 seconds closer to midnight, placing it two-and-a-half minutes to midnight, according to the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. The move was made by the group on Jan. 26, and it was determined by the Bulletin’s Science and Security Board. A team of experts, which including 15 … Continue reading The Doomsday Clock: What Is It, and Is All Hope Really Lost?

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  • fries, food, health

    Report: Fast Food Wrappers May Contain Chemicals that Pose a Threat to Your Health

    Before you head to the drive-thru for a quick snack, take a moment to consider what might be wrapped around the food. These days, it isn’t just the fast food itself that may pose a threat to your health. A new study suggests that the chemicals used in the products that hold fast food can … Continue reading Report: Fast Food Wrappers May Contain Chemicals that Pose a Threat to Your Health

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  • What Happens When Art Meets Space?

    Outer space is often pictured as a vast, dark environment, dotted with bright stars. Sometimes, there are bursts of colors, thanks to the planets and moons that inhabit the galaxy. You could say it’s almost a work of art – and that’s exactly what the creators of “Space for Art” would tell you, too. The … Continue reading What Happens When Art Meets Space?

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  • brain, health, mind

    Report: Your Brain Shape May Be the Key to Your Personality

    Your brain is unique in the sense that it has an original shape – one that differs from the brains found in other people. Now, researchers are learning more about how the brain’s shape may play a role in personalities. Researcher Luca Passamonti recently led a team of scientists to determine how structural differences in … Continue reading Report: Your Brain Shape May Be the Key to Your Personality

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  • mars, space

    Researchers to Spend Eight Months in Isolation in Hawaii to Simulate Mars

    The Martian landscape is like nothing any human has ever experienced before, but will we ever experience it? In case we do, a group of NASA-funded researchers is preparing for it. A six-member crew is now residing on Hawaii’s Big Island on the Mauna Loa volcano for eight months. Their mission is to learn how … Continue reading Researchers to Spend Eight Months in Isolation in Hawaii to Simulate Mars

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  • vaccine, health, medicine, shot

    A Pandemic is Looming, So This Group is Working to Prep for It

    The next pandemic could be right around the corner. It isn’t something most of us like to think about, but researchers know that it’s a realistic threat that we should be preparing for before it strikes. Now, a group has been formed to help us in the event of another catastrophe. It’s called the Coalition … Continue reading A Pandemic is Looming, So This Group is Working to Prep for It

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  • Gettysburg [Homeschool book review]

    Gettysburg: The Graphic History of America’s Most Famous Battle and the Turning Point of The Civil War by Wayne Vansant My rating: 3 of 5 stars So far in our military history section, we’ve covered several comic books by Wayne Vansant that infuses a bit of fun into our history classes. Plus, when you work … Continue reading Gettysburg [Homeschool book review]

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  • Have Confidence With Your Homeschool

    A young mother approached our offices. She stood there with her wide-eyed 8-year-old whose angelic face was framed by frothy red curls. The mother hesitated until one of the educators beckoned her in with one hand while holding a basket of teaching supplies with the other. The mother stammered, “I want to teach my daughter … Continue reading Have Confidence With Your Homeschool

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  • Centrifuges: How a Child’s Toy May Help Doctors Diagnose Diseases in Blood Samples

    Sometimes, scientists find resources to make medical advances in strange places. One of the latest is a child’s toy, and it may help reduce the cost of diagnosing diseases. A centrifuge is a piece of equipment that rotates an object around a fixed axis. It is occasionally used in laboratories to separate fluids, gas or … Continue reading Centrifuges: How a Child’s Toy May Help Doctors Diagnose Diseases in Blood Samples

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  • moon, full moon, science, gravity

    Could the Moon Have Been Formed Out of Several ‘Moonlets?’

    The moon is often thought of as just a big, bright ball in the night sky, but many have stopped to question how it got there. In fact, scientists have theorized that around four-and-a-half billion years ago, a large object sideswiped Earth. The debris from the collision might have entered outer space, and those pieces … Continue reading Could the Moon Have Been Formed Out of Several ‘Moonlets?’

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  • smog, pollution, environment

    What Is Really Going On With the Smog in China?

    China’s cities (specifically Beijing and Shanghai) are known for its smog, and it’s a big problem. Aside from the obvious aesthetic problems, smog can cause a wide range of diseases and negatively impact the environment – but how bad is the issue? Is it really as damaging as the media portrays? Smog Problems of the … Continue reading What Is Really Going On With the Smog in China?

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  • Report: Zombies Would Overtake Humans in About 100 Days

    If a real-life zombie apocalypse broke out, would you prepared to take on the undead? Most of us know at this point that zombies are a work of fiction, but scientists wanted to determine if humans could actually fight off the creatures in a worst-case scenario. A study published in the University of Leicester’s Journal … Continue reading Report: Zombies Would Overtake Humans in About 100 Days

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  • Normandy [Homeschool Book Review]

    Normandy: A Graphic History of D-Day, The Allied Invasion of Hitler’s Fortress Europe by Wayne Vansant My rating: 3 of 5 stars Once again we return to Vasant’s graphic novels to give a different element to studying history. So far we’ve also looked at his coverage of the Red Baron and The Bombing of Nazi Germany. Now, … Continue reading Normandy [Homeschool Book Review]

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  • pangolin, pangolins, animals

    About 3.4 Tons of Pangolin Scales Were Seized in Shanghai, But What Are They?

    At the end of December 2016, Chinese officials honed in on an illegal trafficking operation involving pangolin scales. In total, about 3.4 tons of pangolin scales were seized at a port in Shanghai. According to Chinese media, it was the largest seizure of its type in the history of the country – but what are … Continue reading About 3.4 Tons of Pangolin Scales Were Seized in Shanghai, But What Are They?

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  • dinosaur, dinosaurs, beaks, birds

    19 Dinosaur Skeletons Have Been Found – What Do They Tell Us About their Evolution?

    Dinosaur discoveries always give us more to consider when we look back on the evolution of today’s animals. The recent unearthing of 19 skeletons in the Gobi Desert of China is no different. On Dec. 22, scientists published new findings in Current Biology, detailing 19 skeletons they found while searching in the Gobi Desert. The … Continue reading 19 Dinosaur Skeletons Have Been Found – What Do They Tell Us About their Evolution?

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  • Report: Your Breath May Tell You How Prone You Are to Disease

    What if you could find out which diseases you may have through a breathalyzer test? As it turns out, scientists believe we may not be far off from this possibility. As researchers explain in a report published in ACS Nano, exhaled breath contains nitrogen, carbon dioxide, oxygen, and small traces of more than 100 other … Continue reading Report: Your Breath May Tell You How Prone You Are to Disease

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  • Report: Depression is More Common Among Pilots Than Previously Thought

    Pilots need to maintain their well-being just as much as everyone else, but too often, their demanding schedules make it challenging. Whether it’s outside stressors or the pressure of the job, the world has seen some tragedies occur at the hand of people in dire need of help. This is what inspired a group of … Continue reading Report: Depression is More Common Among Pilots Than Previously Thought

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  • NASA Scientist: We Could Be in Big Trouble if a Comet Flies Too Close to Earth

    Could our planet be in trouble if a comet heads in our direction? One NASA scientist believes this may be the case, but a lot of factors will come into play. Dr. Joseph Nuth, a researcher at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, made his opinion known while speaking at the annual meeting of the American … Continue reading NASA Scientist: We Could Be in Big Trouble if a Comet Flies Too Close to Earth

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  • bird, birds, sparrows, animals

    Christmas is for the Birds: Let the Bird-Counting Season Begin!

    Bird counting might seem like a needless, time-consuming hobby, but many people look forward to it annually around the holiday season. Thanks to the National Audubon Society, bird enthusiasts can collectively come together to count birds in their local areas each year. The Christmas Bird Count, as it’s been titled, is an event held every … Continue reading Christmas is for the Birds: Let the Bird-Counting Season Begin!

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  • Report: 1 Cigarette Per Day is Enough to Shorten Your Lifespan

    One cigarette can’t hurt, right? As it turns out, a new study has discovered just that – it only takes one cigarette to have a negative impact on your health. This means that even if you only consider yourself to be a “social smoker,” you might want to quit while you’re ahead. Researchers from the … Continue reading Report: 1 Cigarette Per Day is Enough to Shorten Your Lifespan

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  • As Antarctic Ice Melts, Scientists See Polar Bear Numbers Dropping in the Arctic

    As scientists continue to watch the North and South poles evolve, they are finding more research indicating that ice melting may be more severe than previously thought. At the end of November, NASA worked on wrapping up its annual study on Antarctic ice. Operation IceBridge, as it’s known, is in its eighth year. As a … Continue reading As Antarctic Ice Melts, Scientists See Polar Bear Numbers Dropping in the Arctic

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  • Study: Sleep Deprivation is Costing the U.S. Economy $400 Billion Annually

    We don’t get enough sleep. No, really – research shows that we don’t. A study recently published by the RAND Corporation set out to find out not only how little we sleep, but how it’s impacting the economy. They centered their research on this key fact from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: … Continue reading Study: Sleep Deprivation is Costing the U.S. Economy $400 Billion Annually

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  • Could MDMA Be a Viable Treatment for PTSD Patients?

    Those living with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) face a number of obstacles when it comes to treatment and maintenance. There are the overall challenges of finding and paying for treatment, and then there are the actual options available on the market. What if you were told that a drug like ecstasy could potentially help you … Continue reading Could MDMA Be a Viable Treatment for PTSD Patients?

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  • What are “Ghost Forests?”

    The term “ghost forest” might sound spooky at first, but it is used to describe a non-supernatural problem in the science community. Ghost forests are often viewed as examples of deforestation, courtesy of global warming. Due to rising sea levels, some coastal landscapes are being reshaped as trees are being “poisoned.” “A ghost forest is … Continue reading What are “Ghost Forests?”

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  • The Extraordinary Memory of Dogs

    Dogs are man’s (and woman’s) best friend, and they know about us than we may think. This is what researchers have concluded in a report published in Current Biology. As it turns out, dogs might remember and relive experiences just as their [human] owners do. The researchers looked at a group of 17 dogs to … Continue reading The Extraordinary Memory of Dogs

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  • Why Do Seabirds Consume Large Amounts of Plastic?

    If you smell something good cooking in the kitchen, you head over to check it out, right? This is exactly what sea birds think when they’re hovering over the ocean. A new study found that this may be why they ingest plastic as a part of their regular diet. Yes, plastic. Unfortunately, the plastic that … Continue reading Why Do Seabirds Consume Large Amounts of Plastic?

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  • The Red Baron [Homeschool Book Review]

    This book review is part of an ongoing effort to help the homeschool community find fun, informative, and valuable books to add to their curriculum. I obtained this a copy of this book from one of the homeschooling mother’s we work with and was charged with both evaluating it and coming up with questions to … Continue reading The Red Baron [Homeschool Book Review]

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  • occult, occult day, science, crystal ball

    November 18 is Occult Day!

    Editor’s note: This piece is part of the geek holiday collection, but also because even great minds like Newton believed in more occult-like things. Just because we live in a world that is more based in the real and tangible doesn’t mean we can’t give a nod to the curious hidden world. Occult Day might … Continue reading November 18 is Occult Day!

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  • oceanography, ocean, marine life

    There is Evidently a “Jacuzzi of Despair” Awaiting Us in the Ocean

    Taking a dip in a hot tub is one thing, but walking into a “Jacuzzi of Despair?” It doesn’t sound as pleasant. This is what scientists are calling a lake found under the ocean in the Gulf of Mexico. Just as it name sounds, the lake acts like a Jacuzzi that sucks creatures into it … Continue reading There is Evidently a “Jacuzzi of Despair” Awaiting Us in the Ocean

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  • dinosaur, brain, dinosaurs, archaelogy

    Scientists Have Discovered a Fossilized Piece of a Dinosaur’s Brain

    Scientists who were dreaming of one day finding fossilized dinosaur brain tissue recently got their wish, but they couldn’t have imagined it would be “pickled.” This is what happened, according to a new report published in The Geological Society of London, and researchers are still marveling at their discovery. “The chances of preserving brain tissue … Continue reading Scientists Have Discovered a Fossilized Piece of a Dinosaur’s Brain

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  • snow leopards, animals, extinction

    Snow Leopards are in Trouble, and the Future Isn’t Looking Bright

    If you love snow leopards, you might want to prepare yourself for some disheartening news. A new report from TRAFFIC, the wildlife trade monitoring network, claims that there are only about 4,000 snow leopards left in the wild. Additionally, an average of four leopards a week are being poached, according to experts. However, not everyone … Continue reading Snow Leopards are in Trouble, and the Future Isn’t Looking Bright

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  • Little White Lies: How Your Brain Adapts to Dishonesty

    If you’ve ever caught yourself telling a white lie, don’t feel too bad – blame it on your brain. New research suggests that your brain might be accustomed to lying if you’ve done it enough in the past. A study published in Nature Neuroscience shows that the brain can pick up on these types of … Continue reading Little White Lies: How Your Brain Adapts to Dishonesty

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  • The Making of an Era

    Guy Fawkes Day is a holiday in England and some of the commonwealths that celebrate a failed assassination of King James I. The attempt was both a religious protest as well as a political one. The conspirators plotted to blow up King James on the opening of Parliament, November 5 1605. Tensions were high. Queen … Continue reading The Making of an Era

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  • Uncovering a King

    Today is a surprising geeky holiday that is not just for archaeologists. It’s King Tut’s Day, and everyone that loves the romance of digging up the past, Pharaohs, and gold can get behind. The story behind finding King Tut did not start with treasure hunting fever, but rather an accident. Lord Carnarvon, AKA George Herbert, … Continue reading Uncovering a King

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  • Scientists Have Found a Way to Turn CO2 into Ethanol

    Not all accidents are bad. In fact, some of them can turn into sheer brilliance, as what one incident recently proved at a laboratory in Tennessee. In a new study, researchers from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory announced that they had discovered a way to convert carbon dioxide into ethanol. It sounds like something that … Continue reading Scientists Have Found a Way to Turn CO2 into Ethanol

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  • mars, space

    We Might Be On Mars By 2030: How Will We Get There?

    If you thought the idea of getting to Mars was science fiction, there are quite a few people out there who believe we can make it a reality. In fact, President Barack Obama is one of them, and he’s been behind the idea for quite some time. Back in 2010, Obama gave a speech, saying … Continue reading We Might Be On Mars By 2030: How Will We Get There?

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  • fossil, fossils, dinosaurs, bones

    The Largest Dinosaur Ever Discovered in Brazil Has Finally Been Found

    What if someone told you that they had found a dinosaur fossil? Would it be any more interesting if it happened to be discovered an in old storage cupboard? This is exactly what just happened a few weeks ago in Brazil. Kamila Bandeira, a student of Dr. Diogenes de Almeida Campos, has been looking into … Continue reading The Largest Dinosaur Ever Discovered in Brazil Has Finally Been Found

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  • Our Average Lifespan Just Increased, But Have We Reached the Ceiling?

    You may only live until 115. That’s the latest prediction by scientists who have looked into the average human lifespan – so what are you going to do with your time left on Earth? “It seems highly likely that we’ve reached our ceiling,” Dr. Jan Vijg, an expert on aging from the Albert Einstein College … Continue reading Our Average Lifespan Just Increased, But Have We Reached the Ceiling?

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  • bees, pollinators, insects, bee

    Bees Are Finally an Endangered Species, But Why?

    Bees are the little garden insects with fail to think twice about, but now that they are endangered, perhaps more attention will be paid to them. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has given endangered species status to seven species of yellow-faced bees that are native to the islands of Hawaii. They are now the … Continue reading Bees Are Finally an Endangered Species, But Why?

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  • Exercise Doesn’t Have to Be Hard: Just Start Walking

    Many people find it difficult to exercise, but what if you found out it was as easy as taking a walk? This is what a long-term study now suggests after following participants for more than two years. In short, walking can be beneficial to your health, especially as you age. Researchers looked at more than … Continue reading Exercise Doesn’t Have to Be Hard: Just Start Walking

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  • Sea Creatures are Still Being Entangled in Fishing Gear, But Why?

    You might have heard of creatures, such as sharks and whales, finding themselves in fishermen’s nets during harvest. In some instances, these creatures can be saved, but what happens after these nets are used? As it turns out, not every fisherman is cautious about where he or she leaves used equipment. Sometimes, it ends up … Continue reading Sea Creatures are Still Being Entangled in Fishing Gear, But Why?

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  • The Earth Keeps Warming, So What Are We Doing About It?

    If it felt like August was particularly warm, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has confirmed your suspicions. New data shows that the average temperature in August was 61.74 degrees Fahrenheit, which was .09 degrees warmer than the old August record of 2015. Furthermore, it was the 16th consecutive month of record-breaking heat. Overall, this … Continue reading The Earth Keeps Warming, So What Are We Doing About It?

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  • astrology, astronomy, science

    NASA Says No, Astrologists, It Did Not Change Your Zodiac Sign

    Could NASA have altered your astrological sign? Nope, in case you’re wondering. Many people were questioning it – so much that the U.S. space organization had to weigh in on the matter. But let’s back up for a moment and see what initially caused the outrage. What Caused NASA to Step In? The zodiac signs, … Continue reading NASA Says No, Astrologists, It Did Not Change Your Zodiac Sign

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  • Developing Complex Thinking in Your Homeschool

    Edie Weiner, a futurist, once said, “Complexity is the future.” In her TEDx talk, she talks about how our old worlds and new worlds are colliding. In the old world children grew up with minimal stimulus, but in the modern world children have toys in every room, feedback from everything they touch, and they even … Continue reading Developing Complex Thinking in Your Homeschool

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  • Scientists Found 45 Potential Toxins in Household Dust: How Did We Get Here?

    If you’ve been procrastinating on giving your house a good dusting, you might want to think about what may be floating around in the air. Researchers have now identified 45 potentially toxic chemicals in dust samples from homes in 14 different states. This would seemingly indicate that regardless of where you live, there are toxins … Continue reading Scientists Found 45 Potential Toxins in Household Dust: How Did We Get Here?

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  • New Evidence Shows that the Moon May Contribute to Earthquakes

    Have you ever wondered if the Moon does more than just impact the tide? This is what scientists have been wondering for decades, and now, some of them are looking into it. A new study published in Nature sheds light on how the Moon may not only impact the ocean and its tides, but earthquakes. … Continue reading New Evidence Shows that the Moon May Contribute to Earthquakes

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  • Ichthyosaurs, Ichthyosaur, dinosaur, history, fossil

    What Did the “Real” Loch Ness Monster Look Like?

    The Loch Ness Monster is a legend that dates back hundreds of years, depending on who you ask, but it grew in fame in 1934 when a man named Robert Kenneth Wilson supposedly photographed a creature in the lake. Since then, skeptics and believers alike have continued the debate over “Nessie’s” existence, but what does … Continue reading What Did the “Real” Loch Ness Monster Look Like?

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  • Soon, Hair May Be Enough to Convict a Suspect of a Crime

    If you’re a fan of fictional crime scene investigation programs, you know that DNA can be a pretty convincing piece of evidence. This is also the case in real life, but now, DNA isn’t the only proof investigators may have at their fingertips. A new paper published by researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory … Continue reading Soon, Hair May Be Enough to Convict a Suspect of a Crime

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  • ufo, ufos, aliens, science

    What You Need to Know About Alien ‘False Alarms’

    Aliens might not be a frequent topic of discussion, but when scientists discover something unusual in outer space, it’s hard to keep the mind from wondering if we’re really the only ones in the universe. This is what happened recently when Russian astronomers happened to be observing HD 164595, a star in the constellation of … Continue reading What You Need to Know About Alien ‘False Alarms’

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  • earth, planet, science

    A Fossil Suggests that Life on Earth May Go Back More than 3.7 Billion Years

    A fossil isn’t always massive discovery for archaeologists, but when it happens to be 3.7 billion years old, it turns heads. This is what Australian scientists found when they were digging in a newly melted area of Greenland. According to their study, published in Nature, a 3.7 billion year-old fossil now shows that microbes may have lived on the … Continue reading A Fossil Suggests that Life on Earth May Go Back More than 3.7 Billion Years

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  • coffee, food, caffeine, health

    Don’t Feel Too Bad: Your Love of Coffee May Be Genetic

    Have you ever felt like you could never bear to go without coffee for the rest of your life? What about just caffeine in general? New research suggests that it might not just be a preference – you could be genetically pre-disposed to your love of caffeine. A study published in Scientific Reports has discovered … Continue reading Don’t Feel Too Bad: Your Love of Coffee May Be Genetic

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  • We Know Obesity May Cause Cancer, But Which Ones?

    We already have some scientific evidence that links obesity to cancer, but which ones? This is what researchers wanted to discover when they looked at data from both women and men in geographical locations around the world. Their findings, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, show that stomach, liver, gallbladder, pancreas, ovary, meningioma, … Continue reading We Know Obesity May Cause Cancer, But Which Ones?

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  • fish, fossils, biology

    Could Fish Fins be Linked to Human Hands? Maybe, Researchers Say

    Could your fingers be linked to fish fins? Scientists’ new research may just lead us to the answer. A new study published by a team of researchers at the University of Chicago claim that there are significant evolutionary connections between our appendages and fish fins. Evolutionary biologist Neil H. Shubin has been seeking connections between … Continue reading Could Fish Fins be Linked to Human Hands? Maybe, Researchers Say

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  • Study: Zika Virus May Also Impact Adult Brains

    Zika virus might not be a concern for you if you aren’t a female or attempting to start a family, right? Not so fast. A new study suggests that you might be at risk of cognitive issues if you happen to contract the mosquito-borne virus. A study performed in mice has discovered that adult brain … Continue reading Study: Zika Virus May Also Impact Adult Brains

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  • The Arts, Sciences, and Technologies of GIS

    Geographic Information Systems, commonly known as GIS, is relatively a new field that incorporates an interdisciplinary approach to visualizing data. This field is, in a broad terms, an intersection between geosciences (such as geography and geology) and computer science (graphics, data, programming, statistics). The main purpose of GIS is to represent data in a layered … Continue reading The Arts, Sciences, and Technologies of GIS

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  • heart, cardio, heart health, health

    Which Jobs are Linked to Bad Heart Health?

    Your heart might not seem like it needs immediate attention – after all, it isn’t as visible as the rest of your body. However, it’s a vital part, and a new study has linked certain jobs to poor heart health. To draw their conclusions, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention looked … Continue reading Which Jobs are Linked to Bad Heart Health?

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  • book, books, reading, giveaway

    An Interview with Sally Thomson, Author of ‘Reservations’

    Author Sally Thomson successfully delivered everything readers were looking for in “Reservations,” the second book in a fiction trilogy featuring the lovable Meagan Williams and her on-again off-again beau, Jack Stilwell. With just as much romance as suspense, the book takes Meagan on a whirlwind of adventures with her closest friends, and even the FBI. … Continue reading An Interview with Sally Thomson, Author of ‘Reservations’

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  • greenland, sharks, shark, biology

    This Shark from Greenland Can Live to See Its 400th Birthday

    What if you could live up to 400 years? You would undoubtedly see an enormous amount of history pass by, and that is exactly what the Greenland shark has done. A study published in the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s Science journal shows evidence of a 400-year-old shark living comfortably in the North Atlantic. … Continue reading This Shark from Greenland Can Live to See Its 400th Birthday

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  • Johns Hopkins’ Data Science Program So Far

    Johns Hopkins University is a world renowned institution known for their excellent medical research facilities. While the study of biology and chemistry is at the center of medicine, mathematics and computer science are becoming as important to the field of medicine. Quantitative methods of research as key to the understanding of epidemiology and public health. … Continue reading Johns Hopkins’ Data Science Program So Far

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  • Wiper, Secure Messaging App, Shuts Down!

    Users of the messaging app have been having connectivity issues using Wiper. Many news outlet report that the makers of the app are shutting it down. There seems to be a trend of secure messaging apps and private social networking sites shutting down. A couple of months ago Experience Project closed down due to invasive … Continue reading Wiper, Secure Messaging App, Shuts Down!

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  • bugs, insects, insect, roach

    Researchers: Rich Neighborhoods Have a Wider Range of Bugs

    You might think that insects are only attracted to your neighbors – they can’t possibly be found in your own home. However, new research has revealed that bugs don’t discriminate, unless it comes to wealth. Researcher Misha Leong from the California Academy of Sciences decided to look into data from a 2003 study conducted by North … Continue reading Researchers: Rich Neighborhoods Have a Wider Range of Bugs

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  • book, books, reading, giveaway

    Sally Thomson’s ‘Reservations’ Keeps Readers Craving for More of Everything

    Captivating, thrilling and addictive. Those three words perfectly describe “Reservations,” the second book in a series by Sally Thomson. “Reservations” starts out simple enough with Meagan Williams, the protagonist of the series, looking to move on from a relationship-gone-bad with Jack Stilwell, an FBI agent. It doesn’t take long for the two to give their … Continue reading Sally Thomson’s ‘Reservations’ Keeps Readers Craving for More of Everything

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  • earth, global warming, science, environment

    The State of the Climate Report has Been Published, and It Doesn’t Look Good

    The latest edition of the “State of the Climate” report has been published, and the results don’t look good. Every year, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration gauges the health of the planet in its report. This year’s edition shows that greenhouse gas concentrations, global surface temperatures, sea surface temperature, global upper ocean heat content, … Continue reading The State of the Climate Report has Been Published, and It Doesn’t Look Good

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  • New Zealand Wants to Get Rid of All Its Rats, But Why?

    Rats are a problem in many large cities in the U.S., but what if they were considered to be immensely disruptive to our country as a whole? This is what New Zealand is claiming in its decision to eradicate rats from all of its islands by 2050. Additionally, it wants to get rid of stoats … Continue reading New Zealand Wants to Get Rid of All Its Rats, But Why?

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  • ferrets, animals, science

    Soon, Endangered Ferrets Will Be Munching on Snacks for Better Health

    What if delicious snacks were the solution to saving some of the world’s endangered species? This is what the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is hoping as it looks to save black-footed ferrets. In a new plan, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is looking to save these endangered critters in Montana with drones and snacks … Continue reading Soon, Endangered Ferrets Will Be Munching on Snacks for Better Health

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  • China is Where You Can Find ‘The World’s Saddest Polar Bear’

    It’s no secret that polar bears are having a hard time in today’s world, especially with ongoing global warming. However, China might just have made matters worse with an exhibit that puts the bears’ misery on display for the public to see. A bear named Pizza housed at an “ocean theme park” at the Grandview … Continue reading China is Where You Can Find ‘The World’s Saddest Polar Bear’

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  • earth, global warming, science, weather

    Study: No, Those Boreal Forests Won’t Save Us From Global Warming

    Those who fear climate change might be glad to hear that forests consume up to 30 percent of the human-caused greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide, which is responsible for global warming. However, a new study suggests that even the densest forests in North America might have little impact on carbon dioxide reduction. In a study published … Continue reading Study: No, Those Boreal Forests Won’t Save Us From Global Warming

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  • Bombing of Nazi Germany [Homeschool Book Review]

    This book review is part of an ongoing effort to help the homeschool community find fun, informative, and valuable books to add to their curriculum. I obtained this a copy of this book from one of the homeschooling mother’s we work with and was charged with both evaluating it and coming up with questions to … Continue reading Bombing of Nazi Germany [Homeschool Book Review]

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  • Reservations by Sally Thompson Book Giveaway

    Book Giveaway: Reservations by Sally Thompson

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  • Why Microsoft’s E3 Conference was a Disaster!

    Microsoft announced they are releasing two new consoles, both are upgrades to their current one, in their E3 conference. This is a disastrous move for the Xbox community. Many are either upset or confused by these upgrades. Gaming consoles have always been stable with hardware in any given generation. The consumer buys the console and … Continue reading Why Microsoft’s E3 Conference was a Disaster!

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  • Archaeologists Discover a New Dinosaur, But Is It a Megaraptor?

    A dinosaur fossil discovered in Argentina represents a new species of theropod dinosaur, but is it truly a megaraptor? The age-old debate now resumes, thanks to a study published in PLoS One on July 20. The skull, axial skeleton, pelvis and tibia of the Murusraptor barrosaensis have been recovered and pieced together. “Other characteristic features … Continue reading Archaeologists Discover a New Dinosaur, But Is It a Megaraptor?

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  • food, pasta, spaghetti

    A Study Partly Funded by a Pasta Brand Says Pasta Won’t Make You Fat

    If you’re a lover of pasta, you’ve probably heard a thing or two about how packing on the carbs inevitably leads to weight gain, but is it all bad news? A new study published in Nutrition and Diabetes says that this may not be the case. The research was led by Italian researchers from the … Continue reading A Study Partly Funded by a Pasta Brand Says Pasta Won’t Make You Fat

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  • t-rex, dinosaurs, science

    But Really, Why Did the T. Rex Have Such Tiny Arms?

    The Tyrannosaurus Rex is known for having tiny arms, but there has been much debate over why the carnivore evolved in this manner. Now, a newly discovered dinosaur is opening up the possibilities. The creature, known as Gualicho shinyae, was featured in PLoS One on July 13. Archaeologists link it to the Argentina region and … Continue reading But Really, Why Did the T. Rex Have Such Tiny Arms?

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  • What is Blockchain technology and Why Should You Care?

    Blockchain technology is a form of database that is not centrally maintained. The database is distributed through a cloud-based, or cloud-like, systems that are linked. The data records and the processing of these records are not done by one central server, agency, or person. This technology is most notably used in bitcoin transactions. How does … Continue reading What is Blockchain technology and Why Should You Care?

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  • What’s with Florida’s Toxic Algae Bloom, Anyway?

    Florida has been in the national spotlight as of late for something unexpected – its algae bloom. New photos from NASA’s Earth Observatory show that a green, toxic algae bloom along Florida’s Treasure Coast can be seen from space. Some of the bloom extends into Lake Okeechobee, Florida’s largest freshwater body of water. State Gov. … Continue reading What’s with Florida’s Toxic Algae Bloom, Anyway?

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  • fire, wildfire, california, drought

    El Nino Could Be Responsible for More Fires in the Amazon This Year

    El Nino has been blamed for extreme weather in the past, and it may soon be linked to intense wildfires in the Amazon. The 2016 seasonal fire forecast from scientists at NASA and the University of California, Irvine, indicates that El Nino conditions could lead to drier weather in the Amazon. In fact, it’s en … Continue reading El Nino Could Be Responsible for More Fires in the Amazon This Year

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  • It’s Sad, Yet Official: Eating Raw Cookie Dough is Now a No-No

    If you love spooning chunks of cookie dough into your mouth before actually doing any baking, you might want to think twice. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is here to let you know that there are several ingredients in raw dough that could pose a threat to your health – specifically, flour. The FDA … Continue reading It’s Sad, Yet Official: Eating Raw Cookie Dough is Now a No-No

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  • Researchers: Really, Really Bright Streetlights May Not Be Best

    Brightness is everything when it comes to a lightbulb, right? What if the amount of illumination could have a negative impact on your health? This is what the American Medical Association now wants us to consider, specifically when we’re driving. In an announcement on June 14, the AMA stated that conversions to “improper LED technology” … Continue reading Researchers: Really, Really Bright Streetlights May Not Be Best

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  • ufo, alien, aliens, paranormal

    July 2 is World UFO Day!

    Did you know that World UFO Day is July 2? Before you get your tin foil hat on, it’s worth taking a moment to dive deep into the history of this event. It’s more than just a holiday for sky watchers, supposed abductees and otherworldly beings. What is World UFO Day? World UFO Day, which … Continue reading July 2 is World UFO Day!

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  • Coral Reefs are Thriving at the Hands of Humans in Select Regions

    There has been plenty of news on the bleaching of coral reefs, but would you believe it if you heard that some humans are actually helping them thrive? A study recently published in Nature has discovered that some coral reefs are not in bad shape, thanks to the help of humans. After analyzing data from … Continue reading Coral Reefs are Thriving at the Hands of Humans in Select Regions

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  • Researchers: Coffee May Not Cause Cancer, But Beware of Hot Drinks

    We’ve all heard the old adage that coffee causes cancer. Then it doesn’t. And then it does again. Now, a new study suggests that it’s not coffee we should be weary of – it’s hot beverages altogether. According to research conducted by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, “very hot” beverages (more than 70 … Continue reading Researchers: Coffee May Not Cause Cancer, But Beware of Hot Drinks

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  • pills, medication, health, depression

    Researchers: Depression Drugs May Not Be as Effective in Teens

    As of 2014, approximately 2.8 million adolescents in the U.S. had at least one major depressive episode within a 12-month span. Although it’s widely known that teens experience depression, a new study suggests that medication may not be helping. An analysis of 34 trials of antidepressants involving approximately 5,000 children and teens taking 14 different antidepressants discovered that they … Continue reading Researchers: Depression Drugs May Not Be as Effective in Teens

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  • tennessee, flag, science

    Vanderbilt Professor Helps Discover 117th Element, ‘Tennessine’

    Move over, 116. The 117th element on the Periodic Table of Elements has just been discovered by researchers from Vanderbilt University, as well as scientists from other schools and laboratories around the globe. Joseph Hamilton, a professor at the college, fittingly suggested that the element be named “tennessine.” Researchers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the … Continue reading Vanderbilt Professor Helps Discover 117th Element, ‘Tennessine’

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  • crocodile, crocodiles, animals

    Nile Crocodiles are Now in Florida, Causing Panic

    Alligators are a normal part of the scenery for Floridians, meaning it shouldn’t have come as a shock when a species of crocodile started making its home in the state. However, not everyone is happy with the new creature residing in Florida, which comes all the way from Africa. In Nile crocodile, as it’s called, … Continue reading Nile Crocodiles are Now in Florida, Causing Panic

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  • Antibiotic-Infused Livestock May Be Speeding Up Global Warming

    If you think that your meat-eating ways have nothing to do with global warming, think again. A study published in the Proceedings of The Royal Society B indicate that antibiotics, which are commonly used in livestock to improve animal health, could be contributing to the abundance of greenhouse gas emissions. But let’s back up for … Continue reading Antibiotic-Infused Livestock May Be Speeding Up Global Warming

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  • gym, exercise, fitness, health

    Exercise Can Lower Your Risk of 13 Types of Cancer

    Exercise can not only help you get that beach bod you want, but reduce your risk of cancer, too. New research published in JAMA Internal Medicine shows that exercise may now help individuals reduce the risk of developing 13 different types of cancer. To draw their conclusions, the researchers looked at data from 12 large-scale … Continue reading Exercise Can Lower Your Risk of 13 Types of Cancer

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  • Stop dreaming, start doing

    Every so often you pick up a self-leadership book that goes beyond good advice to solid advice that is so actionable that you want to put down the book and start making a difference in your life. Andrew McDonald wrote one of these books, and now he’s looking to pay it forward by giving 1,000 … Continue reading Stop dreaming, start doing

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  • parks, recreation, nature

    Researchers: We Are Under-Utilizing Our Local Parks

    How often do you spend time at local parks? If you can’t remember when you last visited one, you’re not alone. A new study published in the American Journal of Preventative Medicine took a look at who is using the public parks across the U.S., as well as how frequently they’re visiting them. Nationwide, the … Continue reading Researchers: We Are Under-Utilizing Our Local Parks

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  • counseling, therapy, health, mental illness

    Walgreens to Provide Video Therapy for Mental Health Issues

    As the stigma of mental illness continues to make headlines, Walgreens is stepping up to do its part in the fight against discrimination. The pharmaceutical store chain announced on May 10 that it would be launching an online portal for mental health, utilizing a number of third-party resources. Walgreens will also be encouraging the use … Continue reading Walgreens to Provide Video Therapy for Mental Health Issues

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  • fire, wildfire, fires, environment

    Global Warming May Fuel Future Forest Fires

    Fort McMurray in Alberta, Canada, dominated the headlines last month when wildfires nearly destroyed the area. Now, scientists say that global warming could be responsible for the growing number of wildfires sprouting up around the Northern Hemisphere. As global warming impacts this section of the world, temperatures are increasing at a rapid rate, according to … Continue reading Global Warming May Fuel Future Forest Fires

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  • Can’t Remember Directions? Perhaps It’s Time to Speak to Your Doc

    If you’re not one to remember directions, research from a new study shows that this may be a good time to speak to your doctor — it could be an early sign of Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s disease is a neurological condition that remains to be poorly understood. Though some research points to an increased risk … Continue reading Can’t Remember Directions? Perhaps It’s Time to Speak to Your Doc

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  • New Species of Dinosaur Had Amazing Senses

    Dinosaurs were undoubtedly some of the most stunning creatures to walk the planet, and recently, the fossils of a new one was discovered by Ohio University researchers. The Sarmientosaurus musacchioi belongs to the titanosaur group of dinosaurs, known as the largest creatures to ever exist on Earth. Interestingly enough, they were incredibly common in their … Continue reading New Species of Dinosaur Had Amazing Senses

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  • Report: Leopards Have Lost Up to 75 Percent of their Habitat

    A new report published in PeerJ shows that leopards, one of the most iconic big cats, has lost approximately 75 percent of its historic range. This conclusion was drawn by the National Geographic Society’s Big Cats initiative, the Zoological Society of London, Panthera, and the International Union for the Conservation of Nature Cat Specialist Group. … Continue reading Report: Leopards Have Lost Up to 75 Percent of their Habitat

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  • oak, oak tree, nature

    Will All of California’s Oak Trees Soon Disappear?

    What if all of shady oak trees soon disappeared? New research hints that this is not out of the question – at least in California. In a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in the United States of America, researchers explain that a disease is causing sudden oak death in … Continue reading Will All of California’s Oak Trees Soon Disappear?

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  • earth, global warming, science, weather

    We’re Getting Nicer Weather, Thanks to Global Warming

    If you’ve been enjoying spring weather in your region, you might have forgotten all about climate change. A new study reveals that you’re not alone — many people are experiencing warm, comfortable weather, and it’s due to our shifting climate. However, the conditions aren’t going to last, according to scientists. A piece published in Nature has found … Continue reading We’re Getting Nicer Weather, Thanks to Global Warming

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  • A cluttered desk is the sign of…

         … a sign of a cluttered mind. What does that make the psychology of organisation? Is it beneficial or a slippery slide toward OCD? Turns out it could be both at the same time.       Most of us were raised to clean our rooms, make our beds, pick up after ourselves, and … Continue reading A cluttered desk is the sign of…

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  • birds, science, animals

    Could a Diet of Nuts and Seeds Killed the Dinosaurs?

    Many people naturally assume that a large catastrophic event, like an asteroid collision, caused the demise of the dinosaurs. However, a new study published in Current Biology by a group of Canadian researchers indicates that their diets and a changing environment might have also contributed to their downfall. Specifically, the research points to the teeth of fossils. … Continue reading Could a Diet of Nuts and Seeds Killed the Dinosaurs?

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  • fitness, running, health

    Would You Pay $499 for a Fitness Tracker that Could Optimize Your Health?

    It seems that we’re all on a never-ending quest to achieve the perfect figure, whether it means eliminating a muffin top or toning under-worked arms. Now, one device wants to help you get to exactly where you want to be, body-wise. For a mere $499, you can get your hands on The Naked 3D Fitness … Continue reading Would You Pay $499 for a Fitness Tracker that Could Optimize Your Health?

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  • sleep, medicine, health

    Study: Less Than 5 Hours of Sleep Will Increase Your Odds of Catching a Cold

    Would you try to get more sleep at night if you knew a lack of it could lead to a cold? New research published in JAMA Internal Medicine shows that sleep may be your immune system’s best defense. Data now indicates that those who sleep less than five hours a night are more likely to catch a cold. … Continue reading Study: Less Than 5 Hours of Sleep Will Increase Your Odds of Catching a Cold

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  • Understanding the Power of Believing in Yourself

    Believe in yourself seems trite, but it’s true. In psychology there is a concept called “self-efficacy”. The term was coined by Albert Bandura (PDF), who described this as the belief in one’s capabilities to organize and execute the courses of action required to manage prospective situations [zotpressInText item=”{J4XJ3RZ7,3}”]. This would be like you, standing in front of … Continue reading Understanding the Power of Believing in Yourself

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  • The World’s Most Powerful X-Ray is About to Get a Bit Stronger

    If you thought the world’s most powerful X-ray couldn’t get any more powerful, think again. Known as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray Laser, the device is set to become 8,000 times faster and 10,000 times brighter than before. This will give scientists a new opportunity to see how nature operates on an atomic level. To be fair, the X-ray was … Continue reading The World’s Most Powerful X-Ray is About to Get a Bit Stronger

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  • earth, planet, science

    WWF: Half of World Heritage Sites are Now Threatened by Industrial Activity

    If Machu Picchu was on your bucket list, you better get to it sooner rather than later. This comes on the heels of news from the World Wildlife Fund that shows 114 of the world’s 229 World Heritage Sites are slowly being destroyed. Mining, overfishing, oil exploration and illegal logging are all contributing the their … Continue reading WWF: Half of World Heritage Sites are Now Threatened by Industrial Activity

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  • earth, global warming, science, environment

    Good-bye, Antarctica: Sea Level Rise is Set to Double by 2100

    Antarctica is vanishing before our eyes, and it won’t be long before most of its ice disappears, according to new research. A paper published in Nature on March 31 has revealed that the melting of Antarctica could raise sea levels by as much as three feet before the end of the century. This estimate doubles previous predictions of … Continue reading Good-bye, Antarctica: Sea Level Rise is Set to Double by 2100

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  • These Tadpoles are Just Fine with Living Underground

    You might think of a pond when tadpoles come to mind, but scientists have just discovered a new species that lives underground. In fact, the tadpoles feast on sand, and they’re just fine with their dark, damp environment. The species belong to the Indian dancing frog family, Micrixalidae. The tadpoles, Micrixalus herrei, come from sand beds in a … Continue reading These Tadpoles are Just Fine with Living Underground

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  • Experience Project is Shutting Down Due to Privacy Issues!

    Experience Project is a social networking website that has been operating for a decade. It is smaller in comparison to big social media sites such as Twitter or Facebook, however, that is not necessary a bad thing. The type of users the site attracts is different. The social aspects of the site revolves around sharing … Continue reading Experience Project is Shutting Down Due to Privacy Issues!

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  • brain, health, mind

    Feeling a Case of Road Rage? It Could Be Due to a Parasite

    If you’ve ever felt a sense of rage — perhaps while on the road — you know how it can be to struggle with the wave of anger. Now, scientists say that you may be able to blame it all on a parasite in your brain. A study involving 358 adults looked at how relatively … Continue reading Feeling a Case of Road Rage? It Could Be Due to a Parasite

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  • Researchers: The Battle Between Science and Religion Comes From Our Brains

    The 2016 presidential election season is already off to a hot start, but what if the candidates were told that the old debate between science and religion is all in our heads? New research from scientists at Case Western Reserve University and Babson College believe this may be the case. If so, it would inevitably play in … Continue reading Researchers: The Battle Between Science and Religion Comes From Our Brains

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  • Scientists Have Manipulated Genes to Create a Chick with ‘Dinosaur-like’ Legs

    Cue the “Jurassic Park” theme song. In a study published in Evolution, researchers from the University of Chile detailed a recent experiment involving the mutation of a chicken leg to give it the shape of a dinosaur leg. The scientists inhibited the early maturation of a leg of a chicken embryo to yield the results. Alexander Vargas, one of the researchers, stated … Continue reading Scientists Have Manipulated Genes to Create a Chick with ‘Dinosaur-like’ Legs

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  • Don’t Feed the Birds: Storks Now Opting Out of Migration in Favor of Landfills

    European storks are known for migrating during the year, but new research shows that Portugal and Spain’s storks are starting to stick around — for the sake of trash. A study published in BioMed Central showed that the birds are learning to feed off of the waste in landfills. In turn, they’re opting out of … Continue reading Don’t Feed the Birds: Storks Now Opting Out of Migration in Favor of Landfills

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  • As It Turns Out, the Ichthyosaur May Have Died from Climate Change

    We aren’t the only ones being impacted by climate change. In fact, new research suggests that our planet and its inhabitants have been feeling the brunt of climate change for quite some time. A statement from experts at the University of Oxford now says that one of the world’s largest sea creatures went extinct 90 … Continue reading As It Turns Out, the Ichthyosaur May Have Died from Climate Change

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  • Transparency Report, March 2016

    March was a slow time in many regards. Slow in spending, slow in growing. We spent the month trying to recoup our financial padding after purchasing Instapage software, planning, and increasing our marketing efforts. This year is, frankly, the first year we’ve tried to do any sort of real marketing. Since we want to be … Continue reading Transparency Report, March 2016

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  • Disrupting Science With New Ideas

    When headlines read that an industry was turned on it’s head or disrupted, if you will, it gets not only the public and the media fired up, but also re-energizes the industry in question. It’s not a new concept — after all, those in the renaissance of science and technology would have been hard pressed … Continue reading Disrupting Science With New Ideas

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  • food, health, medicine

    It’s Official: Half of the Food Americans Eat is ‘Junk’

    Next time you feel bad about dipping your hand into a bag of potato chips, remember that you’re not alone. In fact, a new study shows that about half of what Americans consume can be categorized as “junk food.” In the study, which was published in BMJ Open, “junk food” was defined as ultra-processed food (think added … Continue reading It’s Official: Half of the Food Americans Eat is ‘Junk’

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  • What’s the Big Deal with Apple VS. FBI?

    So, all over the internet people are talking about the Apple versus FBI security issues. It is all over YouTube, between every two cat videos there is a video about Apple vs. FBI now! But what’s the big deal? For those of you who were not following this for the last few weeks. The FBI … Continue reading What’s the Big Deal with Apple VS. FBI?

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  • What’s the Big Deal with Apple VS. FBI?

    So, all over the internet people are talking about the Apple versus FBI security issues. It is all over YouTube, between every two cat videos there is a video about Apple vs. FBI now! But what’s the big deal? For those of you who were not following this for the last few weeks. The FBI … Continue reading What’s the Big Deal with Apple VS. FBI?

    Read More »

  • What’s the Big Deal with Apple VS. FBI?

    So, all over the internet people are talking about the Apple versus FBI security issues. It is all over YouTube, between every two cat videos there is a video about Apple vs. FBI now! But what’s the big deal? For those of you who were not following this for the last few weeks. The FBI … Continue reading What’s the Big Deal with Apple VS. FBI?

    Read More »

  • Research Shows ‘Broken Heart Syndrome’ Can Be Caused by Overwhelming Joy

    If you can die of a broken heart, you should be able to die of enormous joy, right? It might not make much sense, but new research shows that your heart and overall health may be at risk if you’re in the midst of euphoria. This means that “Broken Heart Syndrome” and its emotional turmoil isn’t … Continue reading Research Shows ‘Broken Heart Syndrome’ Can Be Caused by Overwhelming Joy

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  • Researchers Say We May Have Already Missed a Call from Outer Space

    Once in a while, you might ponder what’s really up there in the night sky. Now, researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Solar System Research and McMaster University believe that if there is extraterrestrial life, it’s had a good chance to discover our planet. When a planet passes in front of a star, it can … Continue reading Researchers Say We May Have Already Missed a Call from Outer Space

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  • Nintendo NX’s Cloud Computing Explained

    Nintendo’s upcoming mystery gaming system codenamed NX has been the talk of the internet cloud computing circles in the last couple of months. Nintendo themselves did not reveal any information regarding this system, however, speculations around patents which Nintendo filed reveal quite a lot about the system. This figure in particular was quite the flare: … Continue reading Nintendo NX’s Cloud Computing Explained

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  • Ask by Ryan Levesque [Resource Review]

    Ask : The counterintuitive online formula to discover exactly what your customers want to buy…create a mass of raving fans…and take any business to the next level by Ryan Levesque My rating: 3 of 5 stars Ask, as it should go without saying, is a marketing book. Not only is about marketing, but it’s also … Continue reading Ask by Ryan Levesque [Resource Review]

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  • Is the best weapon to fight cancer already inside you?

    The hypothesis that our immune system plays a role in detecting and killing transformed (cancerous) cells was first proposed over 50 years ago, remaining little more than a theory until the early 2000’€™s. In the past decade this theory has not only gained traction as being a critical function of the immune system, but has … Continue reading Is the best weapon to fight cancer already inside you?

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  • Scientists: The Dodo Bird Wasn’t as Dumb As You Might Think

    Although the long-extinct dodo bird may be at the center of many jokes, new research suggests that maybe we should all lay off a bit. A study published in the Zoological Journal of Linnean Society has discovered that the size of the dodo’s brain in relationship to its body is on par with its closest relative — the … Continue reading Scientists: The Dodo Bird Wasn’t as Dumb As You Might Think

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  • alaska, glacier, ice

    Experts: Sea Levels are Rising, but Global Warming is Taking a Vacation

    You’ve likely heard plenty about the sea levels rising over the course of your lifetime, but now, there are even more facts to back it up. A study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America has found that there is a 95 percent probability that the … Continue reading Experts: Sea Levels are Rising, but Global Warming is Taking a Vacation

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  • City of Masks and Between Giants and Old Stone Giveaway

    Life isn’t always about the lab. Or maybe it is, but you’re looking for a way to pass the time in the “hurry up and wait” periods. You know the ones. The times when you’re waiting on the phone, in line, or for a client to show up for their meeting. It’s those quiet few … Continue reading City of Masks and Between Giants and Old Stone Giveaway

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  • Marijuana May Not Cause Mental Illness, But It Can Lead to Addictions

    The use of cannabis for medical treatment has been greatly debated, and it was one of the hottest topics at the world’s largest annual conference on laboratory science, Pittcon. As more manufacturers look into testing cannabis for distribution in states where it’s legal, the discussion over the value of medical marijuana rages on. Now, a … Continue reading Marijuana May Not Cause Mental Illness, But It Can Lead to Addictions

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  • Staying Healthy: What Does It Really Mean to Eat Organic Food?

    If you haven’t hopped on the organic food bandwagon just yet, it’s not too late. Additionally, it might just be good for your health, according to results from a new study. Researchers recently took a look at whether organic milk was more nutritious than the standard milk you can buy at the grocery store. They … Continue reading Staying Healthy: What Does It Really Mean to Eat Organic Food?

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  • Transparency Report, February 2016

    Unfortunately this month we ended up doing a bit more spending than we originally planned. We had hoped that our Instapage account was still active and we had free time on it, but Grace accidentally logged in with her personal account over the weekend, thought it wasn’t active, and paid for a whole year’s worth … Continue reading Transparency Report, February 2016

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  • Research Focus: Homeless Students on Campus

    When students wander around campus, they aren’t looking at people judgementally and wondering if their fellow classmates are homeless. In fact, they generally assume all students are not homeless. I, personally, can attest to that with my own story, but it never occurred to me to look beyond myself to others that might be in … Continue reading Research Focus: Homeless Students on Campus

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  • Behind the Masks: Interview with Ashley Capes

    Tucked away on a shelf in bookstores in Australia and available as print on demand is a book that has poetry, history, sociology, and political science all woven together expertly. You’d not find it on the non-fiction shelves where you’d expect such a book to lie, but rather in the non-fiction section. And in the … Continue reading Behind the Masks: Interview with Ashley Capes

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  • religion, society, science, sociology

    Researchers: Our ‘Vengeful Gods’ May Have Helped Society Expand Over Time

    Whether or not you believe in a god, evidence shows that our ancestors did in the past. Furthermore, it may have fueled their fears and assisted with the expansion of society. A new study published in Nature shows that religiosity might have contributed to greater cooperation and collaboration, despite geographic separation between groups of people. “Our results … Continue reading Researchers: Our ‘Vengeful Gods’ May Have Helped Society Expand Over Time

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  • Study: Rate of Dementia is Decreasing, But We Don’t Know Why

    Dementia is a condition that can tear apart families and relationships, and there have been few breakthroughs in terms of cures. Now, a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine may give hope to those who are being affected by the ailment. The Framingham Heart Study shows that new rates of dementia may actually be … Continue reading Study: Rate of Dementia is Decreasing, But We Don’t Know Why

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  • wine, alcohol, pregnancy, health

    CDC: If You’re a Female and Not on Birth Control, Stay Away from Drinking

    If you’re female and you enjoy the occasional glass of wine, listen up. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently updated their guidelines pertaining to alcohol and pregnancy, and not everyone was pleased with the results. Essentially, the CDC warns that alcohol can impact a developing baby before a woman knows she’s pregnant. … Continue reading CDC: If You’re a Female and Not on Birth Control, Stay Away from Drinking

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  • Researchers: That Food Served at the Super Bowl Party Could Kill You

    If you had a good time at the Super Bowl party you went to on Feb. 7, let’s hope your immune system is still in check. A study released just in time for this year’s big game revealed that there is a direct link between flu deaths and people who live in counties that have … Continue reading Researchers: That Food Served at the Super Bowl Party Could Kill You

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  • Living Hell: Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    Hidradentis Suppurative is a depleting autoimmune disorder that mainly affect the skin and sweat glands. Areas of the body most affected are underarms, under the breasts, inner thighs, groin and buttocks. This disorder manifests itself in the form of boils, swellings, open wounds, cysts and cuts. The immune system attacks these areas causing damage to … Continue reading Living Hell: Hidradenitis Suppurativa

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  • Everything You Need to Know About the Zika Virus

    It’s hard to read through the latest health news of the day without coming across the Zika virus. The World Health Organization has warned that the disease is spreading at an “alarming” and “explosive” rate, which is causing panic around the globe. “The level of concern is high, as is the level of uncertainty. Questions … Continue reading Everything You Need to Know About the Zika Virus

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  • Neuroscientists: Your Memory Bank is Just as Big as the World Wide Web

    The Internet is a big, virtual place, but your memory bank might give it a run for its money. A new study published by researchers from the Salk Institute has discovered that the memory capacity of the brain is 10 times more than originally thought. In technical terms, it is in the “petabyte range,” which … Continue reading Neuroscientists: Your Memory Bank is Just as Big as the World Wide Web

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  • Beaker Set Giveaway

    We’ve heard you whispering sweet nothings in our ears about how you want to geek out with lab gear at home and start your own lab some day. We heard the promises of how if you had another set of beakers, you’d store flowers in one, and experiment with the other. We’ve heard talk of … Continue reading Beaker Set Giveaway

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  • What Does the ‘Dragon Thief’ Dinosaur Teach Us About Past Predators?

    Just when you thought all of the mind-blowing predatory dinosaurs have been unearthed, a new one pops up. Scientists announced on Jan. 20 that they have discovered the fossils of a Dracoraptor, according to Reuters. This dinosaur lived more than 200 million years ago, and it stems from the early Jurassic Period. During this era, … Continue reading What Does the ‘Dragon Thief’ Dinosaur Teach Us About Past Predators?

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  • A 10,000 Year-Old Massacre is Now Our Oldest Evidence of War

    Today’s wars seem never-ending, and perhaps there’s a reason for it. New evidence indicates that mankind’s sparring has been going on for longer than we originally thought. A study published in Nature describes a mass grave found in Kenya, dating back to approximately 10,000 years ago. Researchers believe that the grave may have been dug following one of the oldest wars … Continue reading A 10,000 Year-Old Massacre is Now Our Oldest Evidence of War

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  • Transparency Report, January 2016

    A new year, a new start on the Transparency Reports. Due to inadequate capabilities with Google Sheets, we decided to start fresh. This means no more interactive charts — they didn’t work anyway — a change up in a few expenditures, and no more lame introduction about our purpose with these posts. Instead, all you … Continue reading Transparency Report, January 2016

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  • PR for the modern scientist

    With recent fiscal challenges and public misunderstandings about science, the Acting Director of the National Science Foundation, Cora Marrett, pleaded the case for scientists to begin speaking out and doing some public relations about their research. The idea is that when we inform the public about our research and how it is useful, the resistance … Continue reading PR for the modern scientist

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  • comets, earth, space

    Mysterious ‘Wow!’ Signal Came From Comets, Not Aliens

    Just when you thought we had made contact with aliens, an astronomer tells us we’re incorrect. Astronomer Antonio Paris has stated that a pair of comets may be responsible for the “Wow!” signal, which made headlines back in August 1977, according to Science Alert. But let’s back up for a moment and take a look at … Continue reading Mysterious ‘Wow!’ Signal Came From Comets, Not Aliens

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  • Beijing is Finally Winning Its War Against Pollution

    Before you start giving China grief over its pollution, take a moment to listen to the latest news from the Paulson Institute and Greenpeace. Statistics show that in 2015, Beijing saw a 16 percent drop in its concentration of the most deadly type of air pollutant, according to The World Post. The air quality data, … Continue reading Beijing is Finally Winning Its War Against Pollution

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  • West Africa Declared Free of Ebola — So Now What?

    When Ebola took West Africa by storm, the world panicked as it watched thousands of people suffer from the disease. After two years of seemingly endless death, West Africa was declared free of Ebola on Jan. 14. But now what? The announcement initially came from the World Health Organization after Jan. 14 marked 42 days … Continue reading West Africa Declared Free of Ebola — So Now What?

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  • Scientists: Long Island’s Great South Bay has Become a Shark Nursery

    If you live near the shoreline on Long Island, you may want to listen up. Scientists have found that the Great South Bay has become home to several sand tiger sharks, which are using this area as breeding grounds. Veterinarians and researchers working for the Wildlife Conservation Society’s New York Aquarium are the ones to make … Continue reading Scientists: Long Island’s Great South Bay has Become a Shark Nursery

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  • fire, wildfire, california, drought

    California’s Drought May Bring Death to 58 Million Trees

    Anyone in California will tell you that they’ve been feeling the effects of drought for quite some time. However, researchers now believe that they aren’t the only ones being impacted — Mother Nature is feeling it, too. New evidence published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal shows that wildfires have been worst than … Continue reading California’s Drought May Bring Death to 58 Million Trees

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  • comets, earth, space

    Researchers: We’ve Been Accidentally Under-Counting Earth-Smashing Rocks

    If you’ve always had a fear of the earth ending one day due to a gigantic meteor, researchers have some bad news. Over the last two decades, astronomers believe that they’ve been accidentally under-counting the number of space rocks headed toward Earth, according to Discovery News. Furthermore, these aren’t just any old space rocks — … Continue reading Researchers: We’ve Been Accidentally Under-Counting Earth-Smashing Rocks

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  • Couple Opts to Clone their Dog After the Unbearable Death of Their Pet

    What would you do if you suddenly lost a beloved pet? One couple decided to come to terms with their grief with a revolutionary method — cloning. Laura Jacques and Richard Remde of the UK recently decided to clone their dog after it passed away, according to U.S. News and World Report. Their original dog, which … Continue reading Couple Opts to Clone their Dog After the Unbearable Death of Their Pet

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  • bar, alcohol, drinks, health

    Americans are Now Drinking Themselves to Death at an Alarming Rate

    If you feel like you’ve been hearing more about the devastating effects of alcohol lately, you aren’t imagining it. All of the negative news may not be a coincidence when you consider new research that shows Americans are now consuming alcohol at an alarming rate. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has released … Continue reading Americans are Now Drinking Themselves to Death at an Alarming Rate

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  • These 19 Dinosaur Skeletons May Help Us Learn How the Creatures Evolved

    Dinosaur discoveries always give us more to consider when we look back on the evolution of today’s animals. The recent unearthing of 19 skeletons in the Gobi Desert of China is no different. On Dec. 22, scientists published new findings in Current Biology, detailing 19 skeletons they found while searching in the Gobi Desert. The … Continue reading These 19 Dinosaur Skeletons May Help Us Learn How the Creatures Evolved

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  • Coffee Lovers, Rejoice! You May Live Enjoy a Longer Life

    If you love coffee, you may live a longer life. Contrary to what nay-sayers have said in the past, new research from a 10-year U.S. study found that coffee drinkers were less likely to die of several causes, including heart disease and diabetes. This is in contrast to people who don’t drink coffee at all, … Continue reading Coffee Lovers, Rejoice! You May Live Enjoy a Longer Life

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  • pangolin, pangolins, animals

    China Has Seized Its Largest-Ever Batch of Pangolin Scales, But What Are They?

    At the end of December 2016, Chinese officials honed in on an illegal trafficking operation involving pangolin scales. In total, about 3.4 tons of pangolin scales were seized at a port in Shanghai. According to Chinese media, it was the largest seizure of its type in the history of the country – but what are … Continue reading China Has Seized Its Largest-Ever Batch of Pangolin Scales, But What Are They?

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  • Earth’s Lakes are Heating Up, Which is Bad News for Our Water Supply

    You’ve likely already heard about our planet’s oceans warming up, but what about the lakes? Well, those are heating up as well, according to UPI. A new study published in Geophysical Research Letters has found that the world’s lakes are increasing in temperature by an average rate of 0.61 degrees Fahrenheit each decade. This outpaces the ocean … Continue reading Earth’s Lakes are Heating Up, Which is Bad News for Our Water Supply

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  • China Will Get a $300M Loan to Get Rid of Some Smog

    We all already knew that China had a problem with its smog, and now, it may be getting a little assistance. The Associated Press reported on Dec. 10 that the Asian Development Bank has given China $300 million to clean up its capital. The goal is to help the country further develop environmental and clean … Continue reading China Will Get a $300M Loan to Get Rid of Some Smog

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  • Study: Being Happy Won’t Help You Live Longer

    As it turns out, all of those overly optimistic people you know may not gain any health benefits from smiling all of the time. If you’re a scrooge, don’t worry — new research shows that being happy all of the time won’t result in a longer lifespan, according to TIME. In a study published in … Continue reading Study: Being Happy Won’t Help You Live Longer

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  • Transparency Report, Dec. 2015

    As part of our ongoing efforts to be transparent with our clients and the world, we decided to publish a monthly transparency report. This information shows the financials of Insanitek. The goal is to be open and honest about the money flow of a bootstrapped science incubator. We’ll be honest here. We seem to be … Continue reading Transparency Report, Dec. 2015

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  • Bees Aren’t the World’s Only Pollinators, According to Scientists

    Bees are responsible for pollination, but they aren’t the only ones doing the hard work. A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America has found that between 25 and 50 percent of pollination is performed by non-bees. This means that while bees do a lot of the job, … Continue reading Bees Aren’t the World’s Only Pollinators, According to Scientists

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  • A New Look Grant Cycles Using PageRank Systems

    Grant cycles are, for the most part, a bane of a researcher’s existence. We spend countless wasted hours writing, editing, submitting, reviewing, and hoping for funding. Associate Professor Johan Bollen at Indiana University’s School of Informatics and his colleagues have come up with an interesting supplement to the traditional peer-review system that can streamline the … Continue reading A New Look Grant Cycles Using PageRank Systems

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  • sun, sunrise, science

    Study: The Sun’s ‘Superflares’ May Be Enough to Disrupt Earth

    Next time your phone drops its connection, you might want to look up at the Sun. New research shows that the Sun and its flare-ups may be more powerful than originally thought, according to OuterPlaces. A study published in the Astrophysical Journal has found that “Superflares,” which are “orders of magnitude larger than most energetic solar flares,” … Continue reading Study: The Sun’s ‘Superflares’ May Be Enough to Disrupt Earth

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  • bird, birds, nature

    The Annual Christmas Bird Count is Set to Celebrate Its 116th Year

    Get your binoculars ready and start counting some birds! The Audubon Society’s Annual Christmas Bird Count is officially slated to take place between Dec. 14 and January 5. However, many people still don’t know about the event, which is in its 116th year. Approximately 72,000 volunteers from 2,40o locations across the Western Hemisphere take part … Continue reading The Annual Christmas Bird Count is Set to Celebrate Its 116th Year

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  • Drought Influences Californians to Rethink their Christmas Tree Purchases

    ‘Tis the season to think of the environment! At least this is what Californians have in mind as they look ahead to the holidays. A new survey by the American Christmas Tree Association has found that nearly 1 in 3 California residents are taking the drought into account while shopping for a tree. “Thirty percent said … Continue reading Drought Influences Californians to Rethink their Christmas Tree Purchases

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  • Love Caffeine? So Do Bees, According to Researchers

    As it turns out, we may have more in common with bees than we previously thought. New research from a group of researchers from the University of Sussex have discovered that some plants are capable of producing caffeine. In fact, they do so to accommodate bees, which react in a specific way to the caffeine. … Continue reading Love Caffeine? So Do Bees, According to Researchers

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  • fish, coral reef, environment, ocean

    Where Did Those Fish in Your Aquarium Come From?

    Have you ever wondered where your pet fish lived before you plopped them in your aquarium? As it turns out, they might’ve come from Hawaii. When the Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources recently instituted a new coral reef management plan to address bleaching, animal activists were less than satisfied. This is because about … Continue reading Where Did Those Fish in Your Aquarium Come From?

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  • It’s In Your Hands: Evolution of the Human Hand and Aggression

    With shootings and terrorist attacks an almost every other day occurrence in the news, one can’t help but ask where is all this hostile activity coming from? While human beings can be very loving and giving, they can also be one of the most violent and volatile species on earth. You don’t have to look … Continue reading It’s In Your Hands: Evolution of the Human Hand and Aggression

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  • It’s In Your Hands: Evolution of the Human Hand and Aggression

    With shootings and terrorist attacks an almost every other day occurrence in the news, one can’t help but ask where is all this hostile activity coming from? While human beings can be very loving and giving, they can also be one of the most violent and volatile species on earth. You don’t have to look … Continue reading It’s In Your Hands: Evolution of the Human Hand and Aggression

    Read More »

  • But Really, Why are Sherpas Able to Endure the Elements?

    Avid climbers have always been amazed at how Sherpas, the ethnic group of Nepal, can withstand high altitude and take on the world’s greatest mountains with ease. Now, a team of researchers has answered some of the most pressing questions on Sherpas at the World Extreme Medicine Expo. Last month at the conference in London, … Continue reading But Really, Why are Sherpas Able to Endure the Elements?

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  • Broader Impacts from the Public Perspective

    Last week we talked about the potential in crowdfunding your research, and there is even some consideration to take here with the bigger picture. Crowdfunding not only gets some of that much-needed financing, but it also helps the broader impacts of your research. While this is a pretty sweet idea, there is one flaw with it: … Continue reading Broader Impacts from the Public Perspective

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  • It’s Finally Happened: Greenhouse Gases Have Reached an All-Time High

    If you’ve taken a look at the smog hovering over cities like Los Angeles and Beijing, you know that greenhouse gas emissions are a real problem. Now, we have the numbers to prove it. Data presented at the World Meteorological Organization showed that carbon dioxide levels were exceeding 400 parts per million in the beginning of … Continue reading It’s Finally Happened: Greenhouse Gases Have Reached an All-Time High

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  • orca whale, science, seaworld

    SeaWorld Changes Orca Whale Treatment, But Activists Still Rage On

    SeaWorld Entertainment Inc., the aquatic animal-based theme park company, has announced that it will end the Orca whale shows at its San Diego facility. This news comes after heavy criticism of the park’s treatment of whales, which activists say should reside in the wild, according to the Associated Press. However, many people (who probably watched Blackfish) are saying that this … Continue reading SeaWorld Changes Orca Whale Treatment, But Activists Still Rage On

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  • Transparency Report, Nov. 2015

    As part of our ongoing efforts to be transparent with our clients and the world, we decided to publish a monthly transparency report. This information shows the financials of Insanitek. The goal is to be open and honest about the money flow of a bootstrapped science incubator. Financial Transparency This month was a really bad month … Continue reading Transparency Report, Nov. 2015

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  • How is the Brain Impacted by Outer Space?

    This may seem like a silly question, especially if you don’t intend on flying up into space any time soon. However, researchers have gone the extra mile to find out how the brain reacts to outer space, and the results may surprise you. A new study, which looked at the brains of astronauts before and after … Continue reading How is the Brain Impacted by Outer Space?

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  • Sports Supplements: Beneficial or Bad For Your Health and Teeth

    Have you ever thought about your body as a collection of naturally occurring chemical reactions? Modern science has pretty much shown us this fact. The sports supplement industry, however, makes us believe they’€™ve studied all this research and knows what areas of our bodies become stressed during intense exercise. In response, they’ve developed every kind … Continue reading Sports Supplements: Beneficial or Bad For Your Health and Teeth

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  • t-rex, dinosaurs, science

    Paleontologist: The T-Rex May Have Been a Cannibal

    We may frown upon the Donner Party for their reaction to extreme hunger, but as new research shows, the Tyrannosaurus Rex might have been more than comfortable with eating its own kind. Matthew McLain, a paleontologist from Loma Linda University, recently found bone fossils that show cut marks on a T-Rex that could only be … Continue reading Paleontologist: The T-Rex May Have Been a Cannibal

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  • mining, diamonds, science

    Study: The Earth Has Way More Diamonds Than We Thought

    Back in 2014, Wall Street Daily reported that a diamond shortage may become a reality within the next five years. Aside from the celebs who are spending big bucks on diamonds, everyday consumers — primarily in China — have been buying diamond engagement rings as of late. In turn, diamond prices have been pushed up by … Continue reading Study: The Earth Has Way More Diamonds Than We Thought

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  • Your Sunscreen Could Be Altering Your DNA and Killing Coral Reefs

    There has been a lot of news about coral reefs lately, and it hasn’t been positive. Most notably, research has found that global warming may be contributing to the bleaching of reefs around the world. Now, new data suggests that our sunscreen could be harming coral reefs, too. Researchers from around the world have determined … Continue reading Your Sunscreen Could Be Altering Your DNA and Killing Coral Reefs

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  • earth, global warming, science, environment

    Global Warming Could Lead to Global Conflict and an Economic Downturn

    Global warming may be responsible for rising sea levels and habitat destruction, but how is it impacting everyday life for humans? A study led by Soloman Hsiang of Cal Berkeley has honed in on exactly how climate change affects human conflict. Hsiang and his colleagues, Marshall Burke and Edward Miguel, looked at 60 primary studies … Continue reading Global Warming Could Lead to Global Conflict and an Economic Downturn

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  • Could You Imagine an Earth Without Antarctica?

    You might not have plans to visit Antarctica any time soon, but this critical land mass on our planet is in danger of disappearing within the next 90 years. Research has found that the ice shelves of Antarctica are melting at a rapid rate, and soon, it may soon go the way of the dinosaurs, … Continue reading Could You Imagine an Earth Without Antarctica?

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  • vitamins, supplements, health

    Report: Your Dietary Supplements May Do More Harm Than Good

    Before you buy another bottle of vitamins to supplement your diet, you might want to consider the risks. A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine has revealed that 23,000 people end up in the emergency room each year as a result of dietary supplements. The individuals who show up are children, adults and the elderly … Continue reading Report: Your Dietary Supplements May Do More Harm Than Good

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  • Transparency Report, Oct. 2015

    As part of our ongoing efforts to be transparent with our clients and the world, we decided to publish a monthly transparency report. This information shows the financials of Insanitek. The goal is to be open and honest about the money flow of a bootstrapped science incubator. Financial Transparency This month was a poor month for Insanitek. … Continue reading Transparency Report, Oct. 2015

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  • Bleaching is the Latest Problem for the World’s Coral Reefs

    Bleaching sounds like something that only applies to laundry, but think again — it’s a true effect of climate change on our world’s coral reefs. Scientists with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration recently found that more than one-third of the coral reefs on our planet are at risk of bleaching this year. But what … Continue reading Bleaching is the Latest Problem for the World’s Coral Reefs

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  • Study: 30 Minutes of Exercise is No Longer Enough

    This may not matter to you much if you don’t exercise very often, but for those who try to get in the recommended 30 minutes of activity per day, listen up: those 30 minutes might no longer do the trick. A new study published in Circulation has discovered that 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise may not be … Continue reading Study: 30 Minutes of Exercise is No Longer Enough

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  • Gene Therapy Presents A New Approach to Hearing Rehabilitation

    Imagine a world of silence. You could hear no traffic noises, no music, and not even the subtle sound of blood pumping through your veins and arteries. There would simply be silence. This is everyday life for approximately 70 million people. Deafness occurs for a variety of reasons, but for some, deafness is an inherited … Continue reading Gene Therapy Presents A New Approach to Hearing Rehabilitation

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  • ikea, furniture

    In Experiments, Robots are No Match for IKEA Furniture

    These days, it seems like robots are taking everything from our cars to our day jobs. However, there’s one task they’ll never be able to take away from humans — IKEA furniture-assembling (or, at least not yet).  In an article published in the MIT Technology Review, research showed that robots are still far away from being … Continue reading In Experiments, Robots are No Match for IKEA Furniture

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  • plastic, bag, pollution

    Mealworms May Eventually Solve Our Plastic Pollution Problem

    Mealworms may not be the prettiest creatures on the planet, but you might want to think twice before considering them just another useless insect. In fact, mealworms could eventually save Earth from destruction via plastic. Researchers at Stanford University recently shared a study that showed mealworms could live on a diet of foamed polystyrene, also … Continue reading Mealworms May Eventually Solve Our Plastic Pollution Problem

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  • skull, history, murder

    New Skull Shows Decapitation May Date Back 9,000 Years

    Researchers everywhere rejoiced last month when they unearthed a 9,000 year-old skull, and not just because it was old. Instead, the skull represented what might have been the first case of decapitation in human history. But let’s back up for a moment. The skull came from a grave site that was excavated in 2007 in … Continue reading New Skull Shows Decapitation May Date Back 9,000 Years

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  • How Is The Great Barrier Reef Handling Climate Change?

    If you keep up with environmental issues, you might already know that the Great Barrier Reef has been a primary concern for scientists. Global warming and changing ocean temperatures have directly impacted the reef and its eco-system, but conservation efforts have been in full swing for years. That being said, how is the Great Barrier Reef these … Continue reading How Is The Great Barrier Reef Handling Climate Change?

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  • industrial, pollution, air

    Report: 3.3M People Die From Air Pollution Every Year

    You might not think twice about the smog you see hovering over your city, but you’re breathing it in every day. Furthermore, new research shows that it is having a direct impact on your lifespan. A study published in the Sept. 16 issue of Nature shows that 3.3 million people die around the world each year from … Continue reading Report: 3.3M People Die From Air Pollution Every Year

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  • panda, global warming

    Polar Bears are Starving, Thanks to Global Warming

    When people casually joke about global warming, they often bring up the demise of the world’s polar bears. It’s all fun and games until we find out that they really are having a hard time up there in the Arctic. A picture posted on Facebook by Photographer Kerstin Langenberger recently caused a stir when it depicted a … Continue reading Polar Bears are Starving, Thanks to Global Warming

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  • glacier, ice, environment

    Sarah Palin: Are Humans Really Responsible for Global Warming?

    Regardless of her role in the political landscape, Sarah Palin somehow always finds a way to make news. While on CNN’s “State of the Union” earlier this month, Palin made it clear that she isn’t sure if global warming is truly man-made, according to FactCheck.org. I take changes in the weather, the cyclical changes that … Continue reading Sarah Palin: Are Humans Really Responsible for Global Warming?

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  • Study: Earth Has 8 Times More Trees Than Previously Thought

    Hooray for trees, plant life and healthy air! Finally, a new Yale-led study is providing positive news on the environment. Research shows that there are now 3 trillion trees on Earth, which is seven-and-a-half times more than previous estimates. The scientists conducted the study using satellite imagery, forest inventories and supercomputer technologies. Researchers from around … Continue reading Study: Earth Has 8 Times More Trees Than Previously Thought

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  • storm, weather

    ‘Grey Swan’ Cyclones to Become More Likely, But What Are They?

    Watch out for the Grey Swan! You might miss it if you don’t know what you’re looking for, and here’s a hint: it isn’t a bird. In fact, it’s a phenomena known as a tropical cyclone, according to a new study published in Nature, and it’s a particularly high-impact type of weather event. The storm surge from these cyclones can … Continue reading ‘Grey Swan’ Cyclones to Become More Likely, But What Are They?

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  • arizona

    The Grand Canyon and Its Wildlife are Being Impacted by Pollutants

    If you haven’t had a chance to explore the Grand Canyon in all its splendor just yet, you may want to hustle over there before it’s altered by pollutants. More specifically, the wildlife and plant life that are known to inhabit the Grand Canyon might be in grave danger. On Aug. 19, the U.S. Geological … Continue reading The Grand Canyon and Its Wildlife are Being Impacted by Pollutants

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  • Animal Tracking with Drones May Be in Our Future

    What are drones good for if not landing on the White House lawn? Scientists say that animal tracking may be a good reason to use them, according to TreeHugger.com. Researchers from Australian National University have proposed using drones to tag and track wildlife. Although it seems like a small initiative, doing so would save researchers … Continue reading Animal Tracking with Drones May Be in Our Future

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  • Hold On: China May Not Be Hurting the Environment as Much as We Thought

    When you see pictures of devastating smog engulfing a large metropolis, you likely think of the impact that some countries — particularly, China — are having on the environment. However, China’s contribution to carbon emissions may not be as large as once thought. A new study has found that between 2000 and 2013, China created … Continue reading Hold On: China May Not Be Hurting the Environment as Much as We Thought

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  • dog, puppy

    Study: The Evolution of Your Pup is Based on Climate Change

    We aren’t the only ones who have evolved as a result of our changing environment. In fact, man’s best friend may have been directly impacted by climate change. A new study that looked at North American dog fossils going back almost 40 million years has found that predators might have evolved according to climate change. … Continue reading Study: The Evolution of Your Pup is Based on Climate Change

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  • planet, earth, space

    It Has Been Confirmed: The Universe is Coming to an End

    It’s all finally coming to an end. The Universe is ready to say farewell, according to an international team of scientists. Researchers have charted its decline into darkness after analyzing its energy output, the Christian Science Monitor reports. As it turns out, our universe is only generating half as much energy as it did about two … Continue reading It Has Been Confirmed: The Universe is Coming to an End

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  • dinosaurs

    Meet the ‘Fluffy Poodle from Hell,’ the Latest Dinosaur Discovery

    If there’s anything we’ve learned from archaeologists’ discoveries, it’s that dinosaurs are weirder than our imaginations perceive. The latest discovery of a nearly complete preserved fossil in China continues to prove this. The dinosaur was found with hair-like feathers and wings like a bird, according to Reuters. However, scientists say that the creature likely couldn’t … Continue reading Meet the ‘Fluffy Poodle from Hell,’ the Latest Dinosaur Discovery

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  • crowd, population, earth

    The World’s Population Will Top 11 Billion by 2100

    Is there such thing as overcrowding on a planet as big as Earth? Of course there is, and now, scientists say we’re quickly approaching a population problem. Not only may you one day lack that “personal space” you love, but the resources you need for basic survival. Researchers now say that the world’s population could … Continue reading The World’s Population Will Top 11 Billion by 2100

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  • pool, swimming

    What Exactly Are You Exposing Yourself to at the Beach?

    Before you lay out on the sand of your favorite beach, you may want to think twice about what may be lurking below you. There’s been a lot of talk about sharks popping up at public beaches as of late, but what about fecal matter? A new study published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology has found … Continue reading What Exactly Are You Exposing Yourself to at the Beach?

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  • It’s Not Just You: June 2015 Was Really the Hottest June in History

    It’s been a brutal summer, temperature-wise, and now we have the numbers to prove it. Specifically, June 2015 was deemed the hottest month in history — or at least since records have been kept. This was concluded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Japan Meteorological Agency. Additionally, the past 12 months leading up … Continue reading It’s Not Just You: June 2015 Was Really the Hottest June in History

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  • Carbon Dating May Soon Become Obsolete, Thanks to Pollution

    Pollution is a big problem, and it continues to extend its reach beyond just the smog you see hanging over the average metropolis. New reports from scientists studying air pollution show that carbon dating could become obsolete by 2050, thanks to the junk we release into the atmosphere. Using fossil fuels creates a type of carbon … Continue reading Carbon Dating May Soon Become Obsolete, Thanks to Pollution

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  • mars, space

    Elon Musk Wants to Nuke Mars So We Can Live On It

    A Mars habitat may not be far off in the future, but could the chances slip away if we blow up the planet? Tesla Creator Elon Musk doesn’t think so. While chatting with Stephen Colbert on The Late Show, Musk stated that nuking the red planet may be essential to creating a place for humans to live, … Continue reading Elon Musk Wants to Nuke Mars So We Can Live On It

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  • The Benefits of Fat

    Take a walk through a typical grocery store and you will see the shelves stocked with edibles boasting “low fat”, “fat free” or “heart healthy – no fat”! This low-fat diet trend was widely popularized in the late 1980s and early 1990s so much so that government run nutrition programs also became great advocates. Removing … Continue reading The Benefits of Fat

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  • pluto, nasa

    We’re Finally Getting an Up-Close Look at Pluto, and It’s Beautiful

    Ever since we decided to kick Pluto out of our model of the “perfect” solar system, the dwarf planet has been relatively forgotten — until now. Close-up images of Pluto started being released by NASA during the week of July 13 after the New Horizons spacecraft took some snapshots during a flyby. Additionally, New Horizons went … Continue reading We’re Finally Getting an Up-Close Look at Pluto, and It’s Beautiful

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  • What’s the Science Behind What We Saw at the Home Run Derby?

    Over the years, I’ve gone from being a diehard baseball fan to a casual one. It’s not something I’m proud of, but I still make it a point to watch the All Star Break and all that it entails. That being said, you can bet I was glued to my television on July 13 for … Continue reading What’s the Science Behind What We Saw at the Home Run Derby?

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  • Why Ebola is Still a Problem: It’s in the Genes

    In the early months of 2014, news headlines screamed warning of an epidemic sweeping through West Africa. The Ebola virus spread through Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea, and several other countries before a case was reported on American soil and the disease received much more attention from residents of the United States. Ebola may not receive … Continue reading Why Ebola is Still a Problem: It’s in the Genes

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  • Self-taught can be just as good as schooled

    Hat tip to all the self-taught researchers and inventors out there. 

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  • Elon Musk by Ashlee Vance [Book Review]

    Elon Musk: Tesla, SpaceX, and the Quest for a Fantastic Future by Ashlee Vance My rating: 4 of 5 stars Like any book, you get out of it what you are looking for. I picked up Elon Musk as part of my research on inventors and entrepreneurs, so the approach I took was one from … Continue reading Elon Musk by Ashlee Vance [Book Review]

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  • NASA Designs Plane for Mars, Is Buzz Aldrin Satisfied Yet?

    Buzz Aldrin has had plenty to say in terms of Mars exploration as of late. Back in March, he posted a photo of himself on Twitter wearing a T-shirt that read, “Get Your Ass to Mars.” If you can’t tell yet, he really, really wants NASA to make the Red Planet its focus. Now, it seems that … Continue reading NASA Designs Plane for Mars, Is Buzz Aldrin Satisfied Yet?

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  • man o war, aniamls, ocean

    Portuguese Man o’ Wars are Washing Ashore in New Jersey, But What Are They?

    They’re squishy, colorful, and look like something out of a sci-fi movie. However, Portuguese Man-of-Wars (or Man ‘o Wars) are nothing to mess with, even when they wash up along the shore of your local beach. As of late, these creatures have been showing up on the beaches of New York and New Jersey, shocking … Continue reading Portuguese Man o’ Wars are Washing Ashore in New Jersey, But What Are They?

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  • Head’s Up, We’re Already Entering the Sixth Mass Extinction

    If you’ve been anxious about the next mass extinction, bad news: it’s already commenced. Scientists have found that species loss is currently 100 times greater than the expected rate. In short, we’ve already entered the sixth mass extinction, and soon we may face the same fate as the dinosaurs. “The evidence is incontrovertible that recent … Continue reading Head’s Up, We’re Already Entering the Sixth Mass Extinction

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  • NASA: We’re Quickly Running Out of Fresh Groundwater

    You may have heard that at the rate we’re going, we’re quickly headed toward a lack of fresh water. As the creatures responsible for this planet, we haven’t exactly done the best job of sustaining our natural resources. As it turns out, a future without fresh water is not as far off as originally thought. NASA … Continue reading NASA: We’re Quickly Running Out of Fresh Groundwater

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  • How Many Asteroids Narrowly Avoid Hitting Earth on a Regular Basis?

    It’s not a very comforting thought, but the fact of the matter is that we aren’t alone in the universe. No, I don’t mean aliens — think asteroids! These gigantic rocks fly by our planet on a regular basis, but exactly how close are they getting to wiping out all of humanity? A new diagram has been released … Continue reading How Many Asteroids Narrowly Avoid Hitting Earth on a Regular Basis?

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  • A Brief History: Really, Why Do We Call Them ‘Flying Saucers?’

    Have you ever wondered why people call UFOs “flying saucers?” It sounds silly, when you think about it, but there’s an actual story behind this commonly used term. Unfortunately, “flying saucer” is the result of a misquote. Now, it seems as if it will be marked in our vocabulary for the rest of time. Kenneth … Continue reading A Brief History: Really, Why Do We Call Them ‘Flying Saucers?’

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  • peanuts, nuts

    Peanuts, Cashews, Pistachios: Eat Up! You May Live a Longer Life

    If you’ve been slathering peanut butter on your sandwiches to get the protein from nuts, nothing beats the real thing. A new study published in the International Journal of Epidemiology found that eating approximately 10 grams of peanuts every day can lower your chance of death over 10 years by 23 percent. Tree nuts seemingly … Continue reading Peanuts, Cashews, Pistachios: Eat Up! You May Live a Longer Life

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  • Sidewalk Crumbling? Google’s Got a Fix For That

    Nothing is more frustrating (or embarrassing) than tripping on a cracked sidewalk. Now, Google wants to make sure you don’t have to worry about it in the future. Say hello to Sidewalk Labs. In an effort to improve urban life, Google has created Sidewalk Labs to improve cities through more affordable housing, better public transportation, … Continue reading Sidewalk Crumbling? Google’s Got a Fix For That

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  • komodo dragon

    After 20 Years in Captivity, Are Komodo Dragons Now Dangerous to Humans?

    When you think of dragons, you likely think of “Game of Thrones” here in 2015, but did you know that they really exist? The Komodo dragon, more specifically, still roams the planet (and our zoos). Recently, one of these creatures made headlines for its bad behavior. At the Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium in Nebraska, … Continue reading After 20 Years in Captivity, Are Komodo Dragons Now Dangerous to Humans?

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  • sneeze, allergies

    Boston’s Blizzards May Be to Blame for Its Rough Allergy Season

    Boston set a new record for snowfall last winter, and pretty much everyone in the area wants to just leave it in the past. However, it’s hard to do so when you’re sneezing endlessly. Medical experts now say that this past winter could be to blame for horrendous seasonal allergies. Although the amount of pollen isn’t more … Continue reading Boston’s Blizzards May Be to Blame for Its Rough Allergy Season

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  • Antidepressants May Not Be As Risky During Pregnancy As Originally Thought

    Previous research suggested that women should have a bit of concern while attempting to conceive if they are on antidepressants. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors, or SSRIs, were thought to increase the risk of persistent pulmonary hypertension in newborns. Now, a study published in JAMA shows that perhaps women don’t need to be as hesitant about SSRIs as they … Continue reading Antidepressants May Not Be As Risky During Pregnancy As Originally Thought

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  • murder, crime

    A 430,000-year-old Skull May Belong to the World’s Oldest Murder Victim

    Murder is an unfortunate crime that we see daily on the nightly news, and people have been committing this act for centuries. However, new evidence shows that we might have been killing others as far back as 430,000 years ago. A fossilized skull discovered within a Spanish cave has scientists believing that homicide was a real … Continue reading A 430,000-year-old Skull May Belong to the World’s Oldest Murder Victim

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  • The Science of Sun Safety

    Our whole world revolves around the sun, both literally and figuratively. It promotes the growth of the food we eat, provides a timeline by which we order our days, and gives us physical light, which greatly aids in vision. Although we rely on the sun to meet some of our most vital needs, the constituents … Continue reading The Science of Sun Safety

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  • How do you know if you’ll get the Big C?

    Cancer is a sticky subject. It gets us emotional, strikes fear into our hearts at the mere mention of it, and yet it’s unfairly common. So, how do you know if you’ll get the Big C? Some would say it’s a crap shoot and there is really know way to be sure. Others, the researchers … Continue reading How do you know if you’ll get the Big C?

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  • DNA Shows that Dogs May Have Split Sooner From Wolves

    The similarities between wolves and domesticated dogs is fairly obvious to us today, but exactly how long ago did our pups split from their descendants? Research published in Current Biology shows that it may have been more recently than we originally thought. The current assumption is that it occurred 15,000 years ago while humans were evolving … Continue reading DNA Shows that Dogs May Have Split Sooner From Wolves

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  • cemetery, death

    Study: Why Are People Dying in Your Neck of the Woods?

    We would all ideally like to go out in a blaze of glory, but sometimes, death just isn’t that attractive. A new study led by New York State Cancer Registry Research Scientist Francis Boscoe gives us a glimpse into the most distinctive causes of death in various areas of the country. The study shows that the most … Continue reading Study: Why Are People Dying in Your Neck of the Woods?

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  • treadmill, exercise

    Slow Down! Report Shows 24,400 Injuries Linked to Treadmills in 2014

    With more Americans becoming obsessed with losing weight, the treadmill seems like an obvious tool to use in the quest to be thin. However, more people appear to be taking safety less seriously in the process. A study conducted by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission shows that in 2014, there were more than 24,400 people … Continue reading Slow Down! Report Shows 24,400 Injuries Linked to Treadmills in 2014

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  • frog, animals

    Here are 5 Newly Discovered Creatures You Need to See to Believe

    Although we’ve been on this planet for quite some time, there are still new creatures being discovered on a regular basis. In fact, the College of Environmental Science and Forestry has recently composed a list of about 18,000 newly discovered species discovered over the past year. In honor of their discoveries, the researchers typically release a “Top 10” list … Continue reading Here are 5 Newly Discovered Creatures You Need to See to Believe

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  • depression, health, mental health

    4 Common Mental Health Stigmas That Slow the Process of Healing

    The days of rash lobotomies and electro-shock therapy as “cures” for mental illness may be gone, but the stigma surrounding these diseases are not. As an individual with first-hand experience, I’ve faced some of the most interesting and unfortunate misconceptions out there. In addition to having to address these conditions, stigmas give patients even more … Continue reading 4 Common Mental Health Stigmas That Slow the Process of Healing

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  • Research Shows Bi-Polar and Depressed People Feel Sadness Differently

    What does sadness mean to you? If you happen to have a mental health condition such as bipolar disorder or depression, it could be a world of difference. A new study conducted by researchers in the Netherlands shows that there are differences in the brain activity of individuals with clinical depression and bipolar disorder. This would … Continue reading Research Shows Bi-Polar and Depressed People Feel Sadness Differently

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  • Southeastern Mediterranean Sea Currents and Geography

    The Mediterranean Sea is a delightful place to visit, but how much do you know about its geography? Ali Alarafat compiled this basic information to teach his fellow students at Memorial University of Newfoundland. Now, you can get the poster in the Insanitek store.

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  • INK is getting a facelift {Open Letters to the Public}

    From the Captain’s Desk It’s our second year of business. Really, we’ve only been around for a year, though it seems like longer sometimes. The first year in business was a trial to see if we loved what we were doing. The answer, yes. As researchers we love all that is coming with Insanitek. Everything … Continue reading INK is getting a facelift {Open Letters to the Public}

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  • climate change

    Some Americans are Concerned About Climate Change, But Which Ones?

    So you say you care about the planet. But how much? According to a new study published in Nature Climate Change, your outlook on the environment and global warming may be dependent on your region. Research has found that more than 50 percent of the population of Hawaii, California, Vermont and Massachusetts are concerned about … Continue reading Some Americans are Concerned About Climate Change, But Which Ones?

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  • America on (Prescription) Drugs

    Sports reports, nighttime news, and even Hollywood headlines all tell of a commonly occurring tragedy in American culture: death by medication overdose or abuse. The development and production of prescription medication has dramatically changed modern medicine and has aided in the health and healing of innumerable individuals. These medications are the product of brilliant minds … Continue reading America on (Prescription) Drugs

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  • Do You Live in One of the Happiest Urban Cities in the U.S.?

    Happiness isn’t always easy to find, but it may be a bit easier if you know where to set up shop. Recently, a Gallup-Healthways poll revealed the 50 “happiest U.S. communities.” The scores were based on five distinct elements of well-being — purpose, social relationships, financial security, community pride/safety and physical health. At the top of the … Continue reading Do You Live in One of the Happiest Urban Cities in the U.S.?

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  • Happy Birthday: The Hubble Space Telescope Turns 25

    This month, the Hubble Space Telescope officially turns 25. To be more exact, it’ll celebrate its birthday on April 24. There’s no telling if a cake from NASA will be coming, but one thing is for certain — the Hubble has seen a lot over its years in the vast, dark world of space. Hubble began its … Continue reading Happy Birthday: The Hubble Space Telescope Turns 25

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  • fish, goldfish

    An Aquarium Dump Results in an Explosion of Goldfish in one Colorado Lake

    Unfortunately, one of the simplest ways people get rid of their unwanted aquarium fish is by sending them down the toilet. Regardless of whether the creatures are dead, many people choose to flush these pets, or release them back into the wild. In some cases, these “natural habitats” — lakes, ponds and rivers — aren’t suited … Continue reading An Aquarium Dump Results in an Explosion of Goldfish in one Colorado Lake

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  • Bats on a Budget

      Bats. When most of us think of bats, we think of an ugly, rat like critter similar to the one preserved in the featured image. We don’t think of the small, cute, charismatic, graceful flyers that they really are. Seriously, how can you think this little guy is appalling? Liam McGuire, lead author and … Continue reading Bats on a Budget

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  • California Shatters Record for Lowest Snowpack in History

    “We’re not only setting a new low; we’re completely obliterating the previous record.” This is a statement from Dave Rizzardo, chief of the California Department of Water Resources. It was a part of his news conference that took place on April 1, detailing the dire drought situation in California. The snowpack in the state’s mountains … Continue reading California Shatters Record for Lowest Snowpack in History

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  • Study: Polar Bears Will Not Be Able to Survive on a Terrestrial Diet

    Polar bears. They’re beautiful creatures of the Arctic that have won over the hearts of children and wildlife enthusiasts alike. Could you imagine a world without them? A new study indicates that this could be the future. The U.S. Geological Survey has found that dietary changes have contributed to the declining health and survival rates of … Continue reading Study: Polar Bears Will Not Be Able to Survive on a Terrestrial Diet

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  • dodo bird

    Could the Woolly Mammoth Make a Comeback?

    Could you picture a woolly mammoth at your local zoo? What about walking through a heavily wooded area out in the wild? Some scientists want to live to see the woolly mammoth resurrected, according to recent news out of Harvard University. A team of researchers has announced that they are astonishingly close to bringing back the … Continue reading Could the Woolly Mammoth Make a Comeback?

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  • Is Modern Technology Making You Sick?

    The average range of human hearing spans 20 to 20,000 Hz. This range is usually better in children than adults, and women are generally more sensitive to higher frequencies than are men. I am able to hear a high-pitch whine from televisions and various other electronic devices when they are on but do not have … Continue reading Is Modern Technology Making You Sick?

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  • Celebrating Space with Tammy Witzens

    Anyone who knows me knows I’m an avid reader of just about anything sans romance. Give me a book, and I’m going to toss it on the perpetually changing stack of books to read. Giveaways of free books? My idea of heaven. That’s where I came across Tammy Witzens’ Have a Nice Trip (left, linked to … Continue reading Celebrating Space with Tammy Witzens

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  • channel islands

    Rare Island Fox Species Brought Back from the Verge of Extinction

    The foxes of California’s Channel Islands may have just set a new record. Once on the verge of extinction, these animals have now staged a huge comeback, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. In fact, the government group believes that it may be the fastest comeback in history. In March 2004, four of … Continue reading Rare Island Fox Species Brought Back from the Verge of Extinction

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  • medicine

    Move Over, Apple: Google Tries to Get Back Into the Health Sector

    What if your smartphone could help you manage your overall well-being? Could a simple app help you get your health back on track? This is what tech giants like Apple and Google are hoping as they roll out new solutions for healthcare providers and patients alike. Take Apple’s ResearchKit and HealthKit, for example. If you … Continue reading Move Over, Apple: Google Tries to Get Back Into the Health Sector

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  • Sandhill Cranes Return to the Eastern Shores

    The birds were once one of the largest population of seabirds seen along the Atlantic coast. Then, in the early 18th century, they rapidly disappeared. Dr. Scott Melvin, who discovered the crane’s breeding ground in 2000 and monitored the birds for a decade, never discovered their migratory route. This past year, professional ornithologist, Matthew Halley, noticed the … Continue reading Sandhill Cranes Return to the Eastern Shores

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  • Fixing Science Communication with Viputheshwar Sitaraman

    Science communication is broken. The media doesn’t know how to read it well, the general public gets lost, and eyes glaze over at a prodigious rate. There is a widening gap between scientists and the general public. While this gap widens, the ridicule about why scientists are studying what they study increases. I had a … Continue reading Fixing Science Communication with Viputheshwar Sitaraman

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  • Jokes Aside, Buzz Aldrin Sheds Light on the ‘Need’ to Explore Mars

    We all know Buzz Aldrin is a brave man, but bold may also be suitable word to describe him. Recently, Aldrin posted a photo to Twitter (Yes, he has one!) depicting him with a “Get Your Ass to Mars” T-shirt in front of the famous Stonehenge. The tweet itself reads, “While at @EH_Stonehenge yesterday I decided to send a … Continue reading Jokes Aside, Buzz Aldrin Sheds Light on the ‘Need’ to Explore Mars

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  • ebola

    Bill Gates Says We Aren’t Ready Prepared for a Global Epidemic

    Microsoft Founder Bill Gates wrote an opinion piece for the New York Times that went live on March 18, and it provided plenty of food for thought on the recent Ebola crisis. Stemming from the health crisis, which took thousands of lives in West Africa, Gates proclaimed that the world is simply not ready to deal with … Continue reading Bill Gates Says We Aren’t Ready Prepared for a Global Epidemic

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  • stress

    Stressed and Depressed? You May Be More Likely to Have a Heart Attack

    Feeling stressed or depressed? Keep an eye on your heart health. A new study published in the journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes shows that people who have high levels of stress and depression are 48 percent more likely to die of a heart attack. This was compared to a group of people with low levels of … Continue reading Stressed and Depressed? You May Be More Likely to Have a Heart Attack

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  • Mysterious Siberian Craters Could Pose a Threat to the Lives of Locals

    What if you had to constantly live in fear of an explosion right beneath your feet? This is what some locals near the Yamal Peninsula of Russia are facing. Giant craters have been discovered across Siberia, and now scientists are speculating that they may have been caused by natural explosions. Initially, the craters were revealed … Continue reading Mysterious Siberian Craters Could Pose a Threat to the Lives of Locals

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  • You Might Look Better to Your Date After 1 Drink, But Not After 2

    You and your friends might joke about a man or a woman at the bar “looking better” after a couple of drinks but did you know that there is some science behind these claims? A new study published in the journal Alcohol and Alcoholism decided to take a look at how alcohol impacts perception. Forty students at … Continue reading You Might Look Better to Your Date After 1 Drink, But Not After 2

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  • Sea Levels Along the Northeast Coast Rise 4 Inches in Just 2 Years

    What if you were told that your house would be completely under water within the next 50 years? Could you imagine all of your belongings under the sea? The hypothetical scenario is starting to scare people along the Northeast coast of the U.S., who saw their sea levels rise almost four inches between 2009 and … Continue reading Sea Levels Along the Northeast Coast Rise 4 Inches in Just 2 Years

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  • The magic and wonders of blue coral

    In honour of “Jewel Day“, a quirky national holiday that is hidden among other random holidays in the US, I wanted to write about a material that Florence of Florence’s Jewel Shop uses in several of her pieces: Blue coral (Heliopora coerulea). The blue coral is a majestic animal that has long since been admired. … Continue reading The magic and wonders of blue coral

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  • Wake Up! Sleeping In May Be Increasing Your Risk of a Stroke

    It always seems like there isn’t enough time in a day to get everything done, and when it comes down to the wire, sleep is often the first thing to go. This much-needed period of rest is essential to keeping you going during the day, but what happens when you get too much? A new study … Continue reading Wake Up! Sleeping In May Be Increasing Your Risk of a Stroke

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  • Females, Take Note! Ovulation May Change Your Spending Habits

    If you happen to be a female, you can likely relate to unusual cravings for chocolate (or other “bad for you” foods) once a month due to your menstrual cycle. Facial blemishes, crankiness, and cramps also go hand-in-hand with this period. However, new research shows that this might not be the only time of the … Continue reading Females, Take Note! Ovulation May Change Your Spending Habits

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  • Germaphobes, Take Cover: Spread of Infectious Disease Set to Increase

    If you’re looking for a new reason to think twice about the impact of global warming, consider infectious disease. A study published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B shows that certain infectious diseases may be the result of climate change. Zoologist Daniel Brooks from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln says that climate change is shifting the … Continue reading Germaphobes, Take Cover: Spread of Infectious Disease Set to Increase

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  • How the Robot Masters will Identify You After the Machine Uprising

    I’ve had a Facebook account for less than two years. Facebook is one of those things (like skinny jeans and boat shoes) that became really big while I was deployed to Iraq. When I came back, reintegration to society was tricky enough without broadcasting my efforts to the world at large… which is why I … Continue reading How the Robot Masters will Identify You After the Machine Uprising

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  • Tornadoes Will Be the Norm by 2080, Thanks to Global Warming

    Unless you live in Tornado Alley, you may not be familiar with annual tornado season — March, April and May. That being said, this doesn’t mean you shouldn’t care. Mother Nature may soon make everyone care when she ramps up tornado frequency by the year 2080. Researchers now believe that global warming will directly impact severe weather during … Continue reading Tornadoes Will Be the Norm by 2080, Thanks to Global Warming

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  • Surprised? Student Loans May Hurt Your Mental Health

    The first study to examine the link between student loans and the mental health of young adults has been published, and the results are bleak. Lead Author Katrina Walsemann from the University of South Carolina and her colleagues looked at survey responses from 4,643 Americans born between 1980 and 1984 to analyze their mental health. As … Continue reading Surprised? Student Loans May Hurt Your Mental Health

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  • Soon, You’ll Be Able to View Daily Photographs of Earth

    Sometimes, we forget that we’re all just teeny, tiny fragments of life floating through outer space. No, let’s be honest: we forget that a lot. There’s nothing more effective at bringing us back to reality than images of space and the blue planet we call Earth. Now, everyone will have access to images of the … Continue reading Soon, You’ll Be Able to View Daily Photographs of Earth

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  • The New Faces of the Anti-Vaccination Movement: Pet Owners

    It takes just one person to crash a party, and that’s exactly what happened in December at Disneyland in Anaheim, Calif., when a measles outbreak began. Since then, the cat has gotten (very far) out of the bag in terms of vaccination and what parents aren’t doing to protect their children. But what about pet parents? The Jenny McCarthy … Continue reading The New Faces of the Anti-Vaccination Movement: Pet Owners

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  • Say Hello to Krystle Vermes, Insanitek’s New Writer!

    If you Google “Krystle Vermes,” you’ll feel like you’ve come across 17 different people with the exact same name. They can’t all possibly be the same one — writing for sites like ThriveWire, Biospace and GetSpooked.net all at the same time, right? Oh, it’s possible. And now, she’s joined the Insanitek team to expand upon some of her true … Continue reading Say Hello to Krystle Vermes, Insanitek’s New Writer!

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  • Giving science in the spirit of the holidays

    For years, I spent the holidays in a state of listlessness. Without a car, I’m unable to find a way home to visit my family for Christmas, and all of my friends went home to theirs. I found my sanity and solution to the listlessness in giving science at a local hospital children’s ward.

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  • Could Living Oil Droplets Contain the Secret to Life on Earth?

    One factor I encountered again and again when I was working as a first responder was cause and effect. Whether a result was profitable or costly, it seemed like there was a whole team of people with no other purpose in life than to research why a particular outcome came to pass. There was even a strategy at one … Continue reading Could Living Oil Droplets Contain the Secret to Life on Earth?

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  • “Interstellar” Science: The Physics and Technology of the Motion Picture

    Today I left work, did not go home, drove to two sold-out movie theaters and finally drove past my house to stand in a line the length of a theater corridor to watch a three-hour movie, after which I (finally) returned home 16 1/2 hours after I departed for work and sat down at my … Continue reading “Interstellar” Science: The Physics and Technology of the Motion Picture

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  • The Science and Art of Brewing Beer [Oktoberfest special]

    Oktoberfest, a fun-fest held throughout the world, started as celebration to honour the Crown Prince, Ludwig, and Princess Therese of Saxony-Hildburghausen on the 12th of October in 1810. The marriage celebration was held out in the Weis’n€ fields that are just outside of the palace. There were days of merriment, but the part that mattered … Continue reading The Science and Art of Brewing Beer [Oktoberfest special]

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  • Hardware, Software, Wetware: The Transhuman Future

    Ever get tired of carrying around important thumb drives (and then forgetting where you left them)? What about headphones? Are they really comfortable to wear? And what about typing an e-Mail to your professor? Wouldn’t it be easier to just think what you want to say to her? What if you could interface with technology … Continue reading Hardware, Software, Wetware: The Transhuman Future

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  • The Genetic Chop Shop: Biohackers and what they mean to the world at large

    The news is always buzzing with GMO issues. Farmers accuse evil corporations of poisoning our food, CEOs announce they’re trying to feed the hungry and scientists develop goats that produce spider webs (you read that correctly – but other than the webbing, Spider-Goat cannot do whatever a spider can). What is going on with genetics?

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  • Miniature images of the planets of the solar system are arranged across a length of toilet paper.

    That’s Why It’s Called “Space”: Teaching Abstract Concepts About Space, Size, and Time

    In the article “10 Scientific Ideas that Scientists Wish You Would Stop Misusing,” Annalee Newitz spotlights a few common scientific misconceptions. To halt the trend, learners need accurate information, in a way they can process it, at a time they’re most open to it. The middle school years are a perfect time to address abstract … Continue reading That’s Why It’s Called “Space”: Teaching Abstract Concepts About Space, Size, and Time

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  • Problems with Time

    From its slow crawl in distant space to its subjective and fleeting nature here on Earth, time is one of those mysterious forces that we can all vouch for because we directly experience it. But how exactly does it work?

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  • Afraid of math? You’re not alone.

    Racing pulse and sweaty palms – math tests can cause symptoms that are similar to a heart attack, but are in fact the signs of math anxiety. This form of angst is unlike other forms of anxiety; it has nothing to do with intelligence or working memory yet it has been defined as a negative … Continue reading Afraid of math? You’re not alone.

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  • 12-Year-Old’s Science Project Leads to Scientific Breakthrough

    When 12-year-old Lauren Arrington of Jupiter, Fla., designed a project for her school’s science fair, little did she know she would make a breakthrough that would radically change the way scientists think about the venomous, highly invasive lionfish, or that it would get her cited in a published, peer-reviewed study on the subject. The lionfish, … Continue reading 12-Year-Old’s Science Project Leads to Scientific Breakthrough

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  • 12-Year-Old’s Science Project Leads to Scientific Breakthrough

    When 12-year-old Lauren Arrington of Jupiter, Fla., designed a project for her school’s science fair, little did she know she would make a breakthrough that would radically change the way scientists think about the venomous, highly invasive lionfish, or that it would get her cited in a published, peer-reviewed study on the subject. The lionfish, … Continue reading 12-Year-Old’s Science Project Leads to Scientific Breakthrough

    Read More »

  • Raytheon’s MathAlive! Gets Kids Excited About Math

    This summer, kids in the Boston area are learning just how important math is in their everyday lives, thanks to Raytheon’s 2theXtreme: MathAlive! exhibition at the Museum of Science, Boston. Presented nationally by Raytheon Company, the highly interactive traveling exhibit is designed to inspire, to spark the imagination and to reveal not only math at … Continue reading Raytheon’s MathAlive! Gets Kids Excited About Math

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  • The Science Behind a (Common) Age-Defying Miracle Ingredient

    By Simon M. Rook I see claims touting new miracle products every day. You know the ones I’m talking about: The products with near-mythical ingredients discovered deep in the recesses of South American rain forests; the berry purported to cure blindness and ugliness; the pill to restore the vigor of youth; the elixir to instill … Continue reading The Science Behind a (Common) Age-Defying Miracle Ingredient

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  • The Fluke Nuke: History of The Microwave Oven

    In just 60 years, the microwave oven morphed from a $5,000 refrigerator-sized model used mostly in restaurants to a countertop-sized model so affordable it’s found in about 90% of kitchens nationwide. It’s not just the price tag that’s improved as microwaveable foods once known for high sodium and low nutritional value now include healthier options … Continue reading The Fluke Nuke: History of The Microwave Oven

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  • The Neck Pain Handbook: Your Guide in Understanding and Treating Neck Pain by Grant Cooper [book review]

    The Neck Pain Handbook: Your Guide in Understanding and Treating Neck Pain by Grant Cooper My rating: 2 of 5 stars The Neck Pain Handbook is a very short and concise book detailing the causes of neck pain and possible ways to cure it. The authors stress proper posture before more agressive treatment, such as … Continue reading The Neck Pain Handbook: Your Guide in Understanding and Treating Neck Pain by Grant Cooper [book review]

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  • Dirt: The Ecstatic Skin of the Earth by William Bryant Logan [book review]

    Dirt: The Ecstatic Skin of the Earth by William Bryant Logan My rating: 2 of 5 stars From the standpoint of a budding soil scientist, but ever the naturalist, this book nearly bored me to tears. While it was a quick read, interesting in parts, it was also a series of non-connecting short stories about … Continue reading Dirt: The Ecstatic Skin of the Earth by William Bryant Logan [book review]

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  • The productivity power of Zapier

    If a day doesn’t go by that you’re trying to get as much done as possible, yet still retain your sanity, then you’re probably still not in the business mind frame. You know the one where you have a giant list of things you want to do, a slightly smaller list of things you have … Continue reading The productivity power of Zapier

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  • Spook: Science Tackles the Afterlife by Mary Roach [book review]

    Spook: Science Tackles the Afterlife by Mary Roach My rating: 4 of 5 stars I’ve always liked Roach’s sarcasm when writing books, and Spook was no exception. I had wondered how she would approach the topic of the afterlife with her unique mix of sarcasm, non-academic style of demanding reason. It was quite informative while … Continue reading Spook: Science Tackles the Afterlife by Mary Roach [book review]

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  • Study Reveals Consequences of Concussions Among Teens

    Teens Who Have had Traumatic Brain Injury Have Higher Rates of Suicide Attempts, Being Bulied and High-Risk Behavior Given the prominent headlines about the National Football League and the devastating effects of sports-related concussions, we at Insanitek were intrigued to learn about a recent study that provides the first population-based evidence demonstrating the extent of … Continue reading Study Reveals Consequences of Concussions Among Teens

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  • The Philosophical Breakfast Club: Four Remarkable Friends Who Transformed Science and Changed the World by Laura J. Snyder [book review]

    The Philosophical Breakfast Club: Four Remarkable Friends Who Transformed Science and Changed the World by Laura J. Snyder My rating: 4 of 5 stars Summary The Philosophical Breakfast Club is a very good history of science book. It is a story about 4 men, William Whewell, John Hershel, Richard Jones, and Charles Babbage, who strived … Continue reading The Philosophical Breakfast Club: Four Remarkable Friends Who Transformed Science and Changed the World by Laura J. Snyder [book review]

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  • The Little Red Writing Book: 20 powerful principles of structure, style and readability by Brandon Royal [book review]

    The little red writing book : 20 powerful principles of structure, style, & readability by Brandon Royal My rating: 4 of 5 stars This is actually a pretty good reference book. I found it quick, easy to read. This is particularly good since I don’t really dig reading how to write books, but this little … Continue reading The Little Red Writing Book: 20 powerful principles of structure, style and readability by Brandon Royal [book review]

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  • Interview with Jamie Shaur, formerly a volunteer coordinator

    Imagination Station is a delightful little hands-on children’s museum that specializes in science and technology. It’s special because it is completely run by volunteers. To make this happen, it takes the right kind of person to balance the needs of the museum with the people that work there.

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  • Psychology, colour, branding, and you

    Branding and picking a colour theme are two of the hardest things to do with a business venture. The brand is what customers can identify with you with at a glance, and the colours often evoke a feeling and help with the recognition. So, it’s quite understandable that many times the first questions a  new … Continue reading Psychology, colour, branding, and you

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  • The Link: Uncovering Our Earliest Ancestor by Colin Tudge

    The Link: Uncovering Our Earliest Ancestor by Colin Tudge My rating: 3 of 5 stars In my area of study of archaeology and geology, I’d like to say that I have a shallow grasp on the subject of palaeontology. Tudge’s writing of the subject definitely widened my grasp, if not deepened it a little. Here … Continue reading The Link: Uncovering Our Earliest Ancestor by Colin Tudge

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  • The hard truth about Obamacare and the working poor [Financial Friday$]

    Making the tough choices is never easy, especially when you are working poor and straddling the edge of survival on your own. Here is our advice on making the tough choice of how to deal with health care this coming year when you can’t afford an ACA package and don’t get government aid.

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  • Being an owner doesn’t mean giving up your sanity.

    I tallied up my to-do list this morning, and it had 77 items on it in various aspects of my life. I’ve got a company to run and a house to maintain. Just recently I also had graduating from my masters programme on the list, but I can cross that off now. I count myself … Continue reading Being an owner doesn’t mean giving up your sanity.

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  • Using Creative Commons with Your Inventions

    In the field of R&D and invention we often come up against the question of “how do we want to share this?” There are many things to take into account from copyrights to trademarks, trade secrets to industrial design rights. And that’s just scratching the surface. Take a look at the list below for a … Continue reading Using Creative Commons with Your Inventions

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  • Experimenting with the medium: Lessons in teaching science

    I have mentioned before that I’ve worked with bored teens and university students alike. I’ve even been a bored student in any given class. However, I’ve noticed that the way the material is delivered can make a huge difference. Presentation can make an already difficult class even more so, or it could make it far … Continue reading Experimenting with the medium: Lessons in teaching science

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  • A new way to combine marketing and e-commerce with PayStand

    As an entrepreneur it is your job to find creative ways to keep your dream alive. This has always remained a problem for business. Ben Horowitz, a prominent Silicon Valley venture capitalist, notes in his book “The Art of the Struggle” that these low points can happen because the economy slows, you’re struggling with new … Continue reading A new way to combine marketing and e-commerce with PayStand

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  • Patently Ridiculous by Richard Ross [book review]

    Patently Ridiculous by Richard Ross My rating: 3 of 5 stars This book is short collection of wacky inventions that passed the through the patent office. All descriptions come with a minimum of an abstract and a diagram. Some come with more diagrams and descriptions. Sometimes they are clear as to what the item is … Continue reading Patently Ridiculous by Richard Ross [book review]

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  • How to pitch your services to get more money [Financial Friday$]

    For freelancers and independents, pitching your product and getting more money out of it is like asking for a raise. Don’t believe me? Think on this: When you are pitching your services or your product, you are marketing. When you are asking for a raise (or even a job), you are marketing your skills and … Continue reading How to pitch your services to get more money [Financial Friday$]

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  • Share stories to build business and inspire

    A tradition in my family is to sit around in the evening with your favourite beverage and tell stories. We often gather with tea, coffee, Scotch, or something else that we might be fancying that day and trade tales about our day, our past, and older stories from the past. My favourite stories to listen … Continue reading Share stories to build business and inspire

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  • Why aren’t more women in computer sciences?

    Author’s note: This research accompanying this piece has been in process since Oct, 2013. This write up and research publication was delayed because we first offered it to the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences Member Central site. However, it took them a while to announce it wasn’t something they were interested in. The … Continue reading Why aren’t more women in computer sciences?

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  • Human Body: A Visual Guide by Beverly McMillan [book review]

    Human Body: A Visual Guide by Beverly McMillan My rating: 4 of 5 stars For the layman, aspiring anatomist or life scientist, Human Body: A Visual Guide is an excellent introduction to the human body. It is laid out in a very simple and straight-forward manner, starting with an overview of the body’s parts and … Continue reading Human Body: A Visual Guide by Beverly McMillan [book review]

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  • Broader impacts and the public perspective

    I am reading a pop-sci book called Pandora’s Seed, which looks at how our genetics tie into our cultural inheritance. In the preface Spencer Wells starts discussing the why behind his book. The why, is of course, rooted in the question “what impact does this research have?” This is a good question for all of … Continue reading Broader impacts and the public perspective

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  • Financial Anatomy [Financial Friday$]

    If you’re reading this, it’s likely that you’ve gone awry somewhere down the road and need some serious help with your finances. Or, you’re trying to do the impossible with very little like every member of the working poor class that scrapes by on barely a living. Either way, this post will benefit you to … Continue reading Financial Anatomy [Financial Friday$]

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  • 20 Insightful Quotes and Tips About Marketing

    Marketing isn’t a mystery, or at least it shouldn’t be. These 20 tips and quotes will take the mystery out of marketing, inspire you to greater heights, and get your business (or your client’s) off to a great start. 

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  • The vocabulary of science

    Language is probably the most important thing we have as human beings. It allows us to share ideas, feelings, thoughts, and news. We use it every day to communicate who we are, what we believe in, and express our emotions and desires. In communicating science, it has an additional dimension to it, whereas it shares … Continue reading The vocabulary of science

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  • Saving by going À La Carte [Financial Friday$]

    À La Carte means picking and choosing what you want off the menu. This can translate to a way of life by picking and choosing what you buy instead of buying the full package. For example, all those cable channels you have but don’t watch? Those are part of a package. What if you could do … Continue reading Saving by going À La Carte [Financial Friday$]

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  • The War At Troy by Lindsay Clarke [book review]

    The War At Troy by Lindsay Clarke My rating: 4 of 5 stars If you have ever read Homer’s Iliad, this book will seem really familiar to you. If you haven’t, you’ll never know that this is basically a retelling of Homer’s great epic. The difference between Homer and Clarke, though, is that you’ll find … Continue reading The War At Troy by Lindsay Clarke [book review]

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  • Financial stability starts with a dream [Financial Friday$]

    If you’ve ever heard anyone talk about financial analysis it usually doesn’t involve day dreaming. After all, money is all about numbers, right? Not exactly. Money is about an exchange. It’s absolutely powerless if you make it so. So, let’s start at the beginning and start dreaming. 

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  • Dealing with your Financial Emotions [Financial Friday$]

    We’ve been doing a lot of talking about how to get financially stable, for we’ve neglected an important facet of this process: Emotions.

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  • Examination checklist [Invention Cycle]

    We’re on our last stage of the invention cycle, and it’s probably the most important for quality control. And, in our humble opinion, it’s also the most fun part. You get to test what you just conceived and see how well — or how bad — it works. This is your time to put your … Continue reading Examination checklist [Invention Cycle]

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  • The Periodic Kingdom: A Journey Into The Land of The Chemical Elements by P.W. Atkins [book review]

    The Periodic Kingdom: A Journey Into The Land Of The Chemical Elements by P.W. Atkins My rating: 4 of 5 stars Summary The Periodic Kingdom by Atkins is an accessible overview of basic chemistry. However, instead of presenting the information that the periodic table can tell us in a droll, textbook form, Atkins takes us … Continue reading The Periodic Kingdom: A Journey Into The Land of The Chemical Elements by P.W. Atkins [book review]

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  • Thermodynamics of Love by Andrés Flórez

    This post has been cross posted with permission from Science and Salsa: The Salsa of Life. This was one of my first notes and I would like to share it with you.  The basic idea was to show how love can be interpreted in terms of energy consumption and how these can affect relationships.

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  • Thermodynamics of Love by Andrés Flórez

    This post has been cross posted with permission from Science and Salsa: The Salsa of Life. This was one of my first notes and I would like to share it with you.  The basic idea was to show how love can be interpreted in terms of energy consumption and how these can affect relationships.

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  • Month of Motivation {January 2014}

    Month of Motivation is taking the place of Motivational Monday. It takes all the motivational images and quotes we’ve posted on social media over the month and compiles them here for your viewing pleasure. Looking for the Motivational Monday posts? Follow us on any of our social media platforms to get them every Monday.

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  • Testing the limits [Invention Cycle]

    So far in the invention process you’ve worked your way around  — and back and forth — along the cycle a few times. You’ve examined the problem, researched some solutions, and even drafted designs. In this test we’re going to look more at testing your drafted design, which as you can guess will lead you … Continue reading Testing the limits [Invention Cycle]

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  • Learning by Accident by Rosemary Rawlins [book review]

    Learning by Accident by Rosemary Rawlins My rating: 4 of 5 stars Disclaimer I wanted to read Rosemary’s book Learning by Accident for research on all aspects of brain injuries. Rosemary’s book was to serve as a starting point for me to understand the caregiver’s role and the stress they undergo, but it turned out … Continue reading Learning by Accident by Rosemary Rawlins [book review]

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  • 3 Good Financial Habits {Financial Friday$}

    When the word “money” comes up, how do you feel? Do you feel anxious? Do you feel like you’re lying to yourself? Or, do you feel like you could do better, but it’s not so bad? If you’re anything like most people you’re feelings about money and your financial situation fluctuates depending on how close … Continue reading 3 Good Financial Habits {Financial Friday$}

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  • Draft and design your dreams [Invention Cycle]

    You’re smack in the middle of the invention process now. You’ve learnt to pick apart and examine the problems, become a Google-fu master, and now you’re ready to crack your knuckles and get into the meat of the work. It’s time to pick up your crayons and construction paper and get to work. OK, fine, get … Continue reading Draft and design your dreams [Invention Cycle]

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  • Evolution, Me, & Other Freaks of Nature by Robin Brande [book review]

    Evolution, Me & Other Freaks of Nature by Robin Brande My rating: 3 of 5 stars I gave this book 3 stars for I’m not really sure what I think of it. I’m an atheist, but my core family is very religious, so I come from a unique perspective. It is neither how to prove … Continue reading Evolution, Me, & Other Freaks of Nature by Robin Brande [book review]

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  • Art of the Brain with Michelle Hunter

    Science communication is an interesting profession. You can choose to communicate with writing, dance, or many other mediums -€“ including fine art. You don’t even have to start in science. I had the honour of sitting down with Michelle Hunter, a New York contemporary artist with an eye for science. Michelle is an artist that … Continue reading Art of the Brain with Michelle Hunter

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  • Researching solutions to the problem [Invention Cycle]

    In the previous step of the invention cycle you learnt how to get beyond wishy-washy thoughts to listing the actual problem. Now, it’s time to find a solution… and see if that solution is really an invention you can patent. To do this we’re going to break this into two parts: researching a solution and … Continue reading Researching solutions to the problem [Invention Cycle]

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  • Creating a “dirty budget” {Financial Friday$}

    If you’ve never heard of the term “dirty budget”, don’t be alarmed. It’s actually a phrase my mother used to use referring to a “quick and dirty budget”. It means something that works roughly but needs refining. This sort of budget is the budget you turn to in a rush when someone asks you for … Continue reading Creating a “dirty budget” {Financial Friday$}

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  • Examing and picking apart problems [Invention Cycle]

    So, you want to be an inventor, eh? Perhaps you have some ideas already, but don’t know what to do now. Invention often doesn’t start with a eureka moment. Instead, it starts out with cursing that something went wrong, quickly followed by tearing apart the problem to find out what’s wrong in the first place. … Continue reading Examing and picking apart problems [Invention Cycle]

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  • Hands of My Father: A Hearing Boy, His Deaf Parents, and the Language of Love by Myron Uhlberg [book review]

    Hands of My Father: A Hearing Boy, His Deaf Parents, and the Language of Love by Myron Uhlberg My rating: 4 of 5 stars Summary Hands of My Father was an interesting memoir about Uhlberg’s youth. He was a boy growing up after the depression, during times of war, and most uniquely, was born to … Continue reading Hands of My Father: A Hearing Boy, His Deaf Parents, and the Language of Love by Myron Uhlberg [book review]

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  • Winter experiments: Making ice cream from snow

    When I was a little girl my granny Cleo would make fresh ice cream out of the freshly fallen snow. I can clearly recall sitting in her living room anxiously awaiting for the snow to accumulate so we could scoop off the top layers without fear of getting anything but clean, fresh snow. Then, we … Continue reading Winter experiments: Making ice cream from snow

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  • Starting a business on a shoe-string working poor budget {Financial Friday$)

    We know it’s possible because Insanitek is proof. Grace, our CEO and founder, wrote a wonderful post on what she’s gone through to get this far. However, she’s not the only one making that leap of faith with no money. Forbes shows that it’s also a trend that’s on the upswing with a demonstration of 20 … Continue reading Starting a business on a shoe-string working poor budget {Financial Friday$)

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  • The invention process [Invention Cycle]

    There is no right way to invent something. Some people take a slow, methodical route testing theory after theory before ever working with their hands. Some go straight for the supplies and start tinkering. Still, others, and a great majority of inventors, use a combination of the two. There really isn’t a magic ratio for … Continue reading The invention process [Invention Cycle]

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  • On Killing: The Psychological Cost of Learning to Kill in War and Society by Dave Grossman {book review}

    On Killing: The Psychological Cost of Learning to Kill in War and Society by Dave Grossman My rating: 2 of 5 stars This is one of those books you have to take with a grain of salt. While reading it, it was very clear that the author grew up in the anti-Vietnam era, and much … Continue reading On Killing: The Psychological Cost of Learning to Kill in War and Society by Dave Grossman {book review}

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  • Motivation Monday {30.Dec.2013}

    Start out the new year with some motivation on living life the way you want to and by your rules. Ready for the new year, new you, and new possibilities? Tell us about your New Year’s goals in the comments.

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  • Motivational Monday {23.Dec.2013}

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  • Where the Wild Things Were by William Stolzenburg [book review]

    Where the Wild Things Were: Life, Death, and Ecological Wreckage in a Land of Vanishing Predators by William Stolzenburg My rating: 4 of 5 stars Summary When we look at the extinction of a species, there is an innate curiosity of our human minds to ask why. This book is a compilation of research and … Continue reading Where the Wild Things Were by William Stolzenburg [book review]

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  • What’s the difference between peeling and soaking a luffa anyway?

    If you are familiar with my personal blog, you’ll recall that this past summer I took a stab at growing luffas for the first time ever.  This picks up where that posts left off at:  the harvest and how to process luffa. There are lots of places and advice you can go to on the … Continue reading What’s the difference between peeling and soaking a luffa anyway?

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  • The Way of the Eagle by Daniel P. Mannix {book review}

    The Way of the Eagle by Daniel P. Mannix My rating: 2 of 5 stars This story came as part of an ancient Reader’s Digest I found laying around a garage sale. It piqued my interest because I am a bit of a naturalist myself, and I thought it’d be an interesting read. Doubly so … Continue reading The Way of the Eagle by Daniel P. Mannix {book review}

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  • Motivational Monday {16.Dec.2013}

    Stop saying, “I’ll do it someday.” Say, “I’ll do it today.”

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  • Motivational Monday {9.Dec.2013}

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  • The Importance of Brain Injuries

    A Broad Problem Brain injuries are one of the most misunderstood, misdiagnosed, and underfunded neurological conditions that can effect a person. This condition is often triggered by an event, such as a blow to a head or a puncture that injures the brain. However, long after the brain is considered healed, the effects are a … Continue reading The Importance of Brain Injuries

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  • Broader impacts and the public perspective

    I am reading a pop-sci book called Pandora’s Seed, which looks at how our genetics tie into our cultural inheritance. In the preface Spencer Wells starts discussing the why behind his book. The why, is of course, rooted in the question “what impact does this research have?” This is a good question for all of … Continue reading Broader impacts and the public perspective

    Read More »

  • Accidental Inventions: The Chance Discoveries That Changed Our Lives by Birgit Krols {book review}

    Accidental Inventions: The Chance Discoveries That Changed Our Lives by Birgit Krols My rating: 2 of 5 stars I thought this book was pretty… and pretty useless.  It takes several (maybe 50?) inventions that we use every day, gives you a vintage looking picture, sometimes a modern one worthy of Etsy, and a short paragraph … Continue reading Accidental Inventions: The Chance Discoveries That Changed Our Lives by Birgit Krols {book review}

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  • The Super-Hero Salsa

    If you’ve ever wondered about how to explain something, anything, then you’re in good company. Andrés Flórez undertook the momentous task of trying to explain his Ph.D. research with dance for the annual Dance Your Ph.D. competition held by the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences (AAAS). I sat down with Andrés to get an … Continue reading The Super-Hero Salsa

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  • Motivational Monday {2.Dec.2013}

    Loving your work is also part of living a healthy lifestyle, and that’s why you’re creating your own business — one you can love to go to every day.

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  • Stacey Trock, the mastermind behind the cuteness

    I’m sure you’ve seen the insane cuteness of the amigurumi plushies (also known as crocheted softies) hanging around the Insanitek store. Come one, I know you’ve at least seen Keiran the Beaver:

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  • My motivation for starting a science literacy program

    Science literacy. It’s more than a buzz-phrase, it is a foundation stone of science itself. Without it, we would not have lively debates, new ideas building off old ideas, and the all important critical thinking to keep the cycle going. Generally, teachers look for “literacy” in the form of understanding and doing well on exams. … Continue reading My motivation for starting a science literacy program

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  • Motivational Monday {25.Nov.2013}

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  • Tim Hoffer on surviving and moving on as an advocate

    Editor’s note: This is the the fourth story from a brain injury survivor and the first advocate. To read more personal stories, please visit the index. My name is Tim and I am a survivor of a traumatic brain injury. I suffered a TBI in 2006 due to blunt force to my head from a … Continue reading Tim Hoffer on surviving and moving on as an advocate

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  • Sharon Krause on a changing life

    Editor’s note: This is the the third story from a brain injury survivor and his thoughts. To read more personal stories, please visit the index. In January 2006, an MRI showed that I had a brain tumor. In February 2006 my tumor bled, paramedics rushed me to the hospital, and I survived emergency brain surgery … Continue reading Sharon Krause on a changing life

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  • Show and tell of science

    Show me, don’t tell me!”, the English professor cried at us for the 15th time that week. It was frustrating, really. How does one show a dog walking with its owner? If I thought that was hard, then showing the various aspects of my own research would be a challenge. Fast forward to several years … Continue reading Show and tell of science

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  • Mike Morrisey’s open letter to his caregivers

    Editor’s note: This is the the second story from a brain injury survivor and his thoughts. To read more personal stories, please visit the index. They say people who go through a traumatic event in their life actually have TWO birthdays – the day they were squeezed into this savage world, and the day their … Continue reading Mike Morrisey’s open letter to his caregivers

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  • Bill Jarvis on recovery from a brain injury

    Editor’s note: Bill Jarvis shares his story of what it is like to go through recovery after surviving a car crash that resulted in much damage, including a brain injury. This is the second in received stories regarding brain injury. To read the rest of them, please visit the index. My traumatic brain injury was … Continue reading Bill Jarvis on recovery from a brain injury

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  • Deal with Patently Brilliant Moves Ahead

    Earlier this morning, Grace, our fearless leader talked with Garvin Putt, the Development Director of Montgomery I P Associates regarding working with Patently Brilliant. Despite the initial bump in Insanitek’s relationship with them (see comments), Grace and Garvin have come to an informal agreement where our inventors can get a 20% discount on patenting services.

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  • Knocking on Heaven’s Door: A Daughter’s Journey Through Old Age and New Medicine by Katy Butler [book review]

    Knocking on Heaven’s Door: A Daughter’s Journey Through Old Age and New Medicine by Katy Butler My rating: 3 of 5 stars Disclosure: I choose to read this book for review because I have an healthy fascination with death rituals which stems from studying anthropology. I also have several friends that are going into the … Continue reading Knocking on Heaven’s Door: A Daughter’s Journey Through Old Age and New Medicine by Katy Butler [book review]

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  • Motivational Monday {18.Nov.2013}

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  • On Caregiving by Rosemary Rawlins

    Guest post by Rosemary Rawlins, Author of Learning by Accident, Caregiving Blogger for BrainLine.org Editor’s note: This personal story is a part of the Brain Injury op-ed series that Grace Conyers is putting together. Find the index to the stories here.  Caregivers are life-links for TBI survivors. When someone sustains a moderate – severe traumatic brain … Continue reading On Caregiving by Rosemary Rawlins

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  • On brain injuries

    If you follow my personal blog, you will know that I’ve recently gotten into an op-ed piece on the impact brain injuries have in our society and lives. It’s a very deserving topic that is very complicated and deep. It ranges from the medical fields and neurology to society’s perceptions and touches on many things … Continue reading On brain injuries

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  • Field trips: A good way to become interdisciplinary in your own field

    If you work in a particular field, you know that it’s all about specialisation. I am a geoarchaeoligist that dabbles in chemistry. Like any good archaeologist, I’ve taken classes in the basics, and I’ve even had the chance to practise a few of the skills in the field. Moreso with being a geologist since I’ve … Continue reading Field trips: A good way to become interdisciplinary in your own field

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  • Motivational Monday {11.Nov.2013}

    Happy Veterans’ Day, everyone! Honour a solider at more than just 1100. Start with all day, then move on to honouring them all week. Here’s your normal Motivational Monday thoughts!

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  • A trick for teens: Generating interest among the apathetic

    Getting kids interested and engaged in science can be a difficult task. Getting them interested for the duration of a full school year is near impossible. This task is potentially more difficult for middle school teachers than any other educator I have had the pleasure to work with. Here is a tale of how the … Continue reading A trick for teens: Generating interest among the apathetic

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  • Developing Innovative Ideas for New Companies {MOOC review}

    Class: Developing Innovative Ideas for New Companies: The First Step in Entrepreneurship Platform: Coursera Length: 7 hours a week for 6 weeks. Subject: Business. Certificate: No. My rating: 4/5 When I signed up for Developing Innovative Ideas for New Companies, it wasn’t because I was struggling running Insanitek. It was because there are many Insanitekians … Continue reading Developing Innovative Ideas for New Companies {MOOC review}

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  • Against the Odds by James Dyson [book review]

    Against the Odds: An Autobiography by James Dyson My rating: 5 of 5 stars I have long been a fan of the Dyson vacuums because they worked better than anything I have ever heard of (though I’ve yet to get one). Thus, when I saw this book sitting calmly on the library shelf, I reached … Continue reading Against the Odds by James Dyson [book review]

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  • Motivational Monday {4.Nov.2013}

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  • Crafting an Effective Writer {MOOC review}

    Class: Crafting an Effective Writer: Tools of the Trade Platform: Coursera Length: 4 – 5 hours a week for 6 weeks. Subject: English language. Certificate: Yes, free upon successful completion of the course. My rating: 4/5

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  • Speaking interdisciplinarily — a parable

    Many times when working across fields, there is a lot of miscommunication, misapprehension, and misunderstandings. Sure, there may be an overlap in ideas, but it’s the nitty-gritty details that trip people up. This poor fellow had a classic case of what a lot of interdisciplinary people feel when they are just starting out: lost for … Continue reading Speaking interdisciplinarily — a parable

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  • Motivational Monday {28.Oct.2013}

    What are your favourite ways to motivate yourself?

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  • The jaded public and the Freedom of Information Act

    All too often I hear people say, “Why should I care what goes on in science. It doesn’t affect me.” Flabbergasted, I point out to them that lots of environmental research was going on in their own neighborhood on water pollution or air pollution. I’ll show them an EPA site or two where they can … Continue reading The jaded public and the Freedom of Information Act

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  • The cultural journey from Samhain to Halloween

    Transport yourself back to ancient times, and place yourself into the Celtic culture. It’s the end of autumn, and you’re around a bonfire dressed up to ward off the dead. This is the holiday known to the ancient Celts as Samhain (pronounced sow-in).

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  • The R&D Cycle

    So, you’ve had an idea in your head for a while, and you want to turn it out into a product. Do you know how to go about it? There is a certain process cleverly called “the R&D cycle” that walks you through the steps to get your idea from your brain and ready for … Continue reading The R&D Cycle

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  • The Power Of Small Businesses

    Have you ever dreamed that your small business would have an impact on your community? How about the entire economy? The RSA Action and Research Centre of the UK has noticed that small businesses are on the rise and helping their economy grow.

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  • Motivational Monday {21.Oct.2013}

      Hard work and preservation is better than a silver platter anyway. It’s more satisfactory to know you earned every bit of what you have from your reputation to loyal clients. Those things and the sense of pride that comes with them speaks louder to the human heart and soul than the bottom dollar.

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  • Death by PowerPoint: Tips on giving successful presentations

    Often times effective presentation skills seem like a forgotten art. They’re treated as an afterthought, as can be seen in lecture hall after lecture hall on any university campus. Presentations are marginally better during academic conferences where the speaker is talking to an audience that presumably cares about the topic at hand. However, even these can seem rushed and cobbled together. … Continue reading Death by PowerPoint: Tips on giving successful presentations

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  • Motivational Monday {14.Oct.2013}

      We you put yourself in the customer’s place, you better understand their needs and desires so you can give it to them. Would you want a bad product? Crappy customer service? No! When putting together your business, think about putting yourself in your customer’s shoes. Then move forward with confidence.

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  • Generate interest, generate diversity

    The hot topic of diversity is not exclusive to schools and the workforce; it also exists in museums. At a Board of Directors meeting at Imagination Station, they discussed not only how to generate diversity in patronage, but how to generate more interest in the museum. When I was asked for my opinion, I was … Continue reading Generate interest, generate diversity

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  • The vocabulary of science

    Language is probably the most important thing we have as human beings. It allows us to share ideas, feelings, thoughts, and news. We use it every day to communicate who we are, what we believe in, and express our emotions and desires. In communicating science, it has an additional dimension to it, whereas it shares … Continue reading The vocabulary of science

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  • Bugs? In Math?!

    Math bugs is a fine little iPhone app that can help teach kids place value of individual numbers. It works by working with kids’ imaginations. While they design and build a bug doing an activity, they learn that certain elements give certain values. Let’s show you how.

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  • Two unavoidable benefits of studying abroad

    One of the best pieces of advice I got as an undergraduate was from a professor trying to convince me to join his study-abroad trip. He said, “You are going to be in debt for the rest of your life, so you might as well have something to remember it by.” It took me all … Continue reading Two unavoidable benefits of studying abroad

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  • How to Lie with Statistics by Darrell Huff {book review}

    How to Lie with Statistics by Darrell Huff My rating: 5 of 5 stars OK, first off, it isn’t normal that I give a math book 5 stars. I often find them dull, boring, and difficult to read. However, How to lie with statistics was as funny as it was informative. Duff does a good … Continue reading How to Lie with Statistics by Darrell Huff {book review}

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  • Motivational Mondays {30.Sept.2013}

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  • Hands-on exploration: A simple method of teaching the public

    Without a doubt, our personal worlds are shaped by early experiences in our lives. For instance, my early childhood was filled with experiences in which I was encouraged to ask “why” as often as I could, explore the answers, and give my own answers to those precious questions. My brain was fuelled by my imagination, and … Continue reading Hands-on exploration: A simple method of teaching the public

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  • Homeschooling Co-ops 101 by Karen Lange [book review]

    Disclaimer: I received an advanced reader copy (ARC) copy of Homeschool Co-ops 101 for free as part of a book blog tour. I accepted in order to help out people that are turning away from public and private schooling and thinking about homeschooling their kids. I am under no obligation to give a good review, … Continue reading Homeschooling Co-ops 101 by Karen Lange [book review]

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  • Motivational Mondays {23.Sept.2013}

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  • What makes a scientist?

    When doing community outreach for science, you hear some amazingly intuitive questions. Normally these questions are from the inquisitive minds of five- or six-year olds, and are along the lines of how things work and why they work that way. While doing a demonstration on vortexes in tornadoes, one eight-year old little girl had other … Continue reading What makes a scientist?

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  • Our new PR routine

    If we have any followers on any social media, you’d realise we’re somewhat erratic when posting things. This was because both Grace and I were trying to do various things on top of sharing with you lovely folks what is going on here. I think we finally have something straightened out now that I’ve shooed … Continue reading Our new PR routine

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  • To blanch or not to blanch?

    It’s that time of year again, and the crops are starting to come in. If you have a garden of your own, or just like to buy things and stock them while they are on sale, you probably have an idea of how to preserve things for the long term. You can can, dehydrate, and … Continue reading To blanch or not to blanch?

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  • Motivational Mondays {16.Sept.2013}

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  • Patently Brilliant

    Good news, Insanitekians! Insanitek R&D has finally found a patent company with access to lawyers to buddy up with to help you get your ideas patented. After months and months of calling various companies that do this sort of work with inventors, we finally found one that would allow you to use our affordable services … Continue reading Patently Brilliant

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  • The inner mind of a 7th grader

    Back in the spring of 2011, I spent some time learning to teach in a local middle school. The first few weeks were spent getting used to the school, school rules, the kids and the teacher. The last couple weeks focused on how to deliver messages to the kids. My main problem is that I’m … Continue reading The inner mind of a 7th grader

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  • 6 in 1 solar powered robot [toy review]

    Item: 6-in-1 solar kit educational robotics Manufacturer: Vibe Made in: China Cost: $3 at the Dollar Store A few weeks ago my friend Fred Chu bought and sent me this awesome looking robotics kit to see if it was something that I could not only review, but also buy a lot of and sell in … Continue reading 6 in 1 solar powered robot [toy review]

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  • Alexander von Humbolt Fellowship — Study in Germany!

    Humboldt Research Fellowships: The Alexander von Humboldt Foundation promotes academic cooperation between excellent researchers and other professionals from abroad and from Germany through fellowship programs like the Humboldt Research Fellowship. Submit an application if you are a researcher from abroad with above average qualifications. A Humboldt Research Fellowship allows you to carry out a long-term … Continue reading Alexander von Humbolt Fellowship — Study in Germany!

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  • Motivational Mondays {9.Sept.2013}

    The critical ingredient is getting off your butt and doing something. It’s as simple as that. A lot of people have ideas, but there are few who decide to do something about them now. Not tomorrow. Not next week. But today. The true entrepreneur is a doer, not a dreamer. – Nolan Bushnell

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  • Mistakes in the lab

    Experiences in the lab tells me that a slight mistake can cost you big. For example, while I was in graduate school, my labmates all work on dating rocks with the cosmogenic nuclide of beryllium-10, while I worked on a nutrient cycle in order to understand the fate of beryllium-10 in organic materials. My samples … Continue reading Mistakes in the lab

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  • The benefit of downtime

    There comes a time in your life when you start to ask questions about what you want to do next. Do you want to spend the time and money going to a university when there is no guarantee of a job when you come out? Is getting into the industry and working your way up … Continue reading The benefit of downtime

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  • Characterization of an outcrop: Greedy grad student style

    I am often asked by professors how a certain class went. Well, to really understand how a grad student may think about a class, you need inside insight at our brains and behavior. These things come out very well on class field trips, one of which I’m sharing here to give insight to a group … Continue reading Characterization of an outcrop: Greedy grad student style

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  • Creative ways to improve attention spans

    I have found a unique challenge that I must overcome when working with the public: their hearing. In the past, I have noticed that many of my students, which range from ages 6 to 16, have trouble hearing. It is usually little things like a word out of a sentence that they misunderstood. However, those … Continue reading Creative ways to improve attention spans

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  • Motivational Mondays {19.Aug.2013}

    Alesi found this gem on the Modern Guild Blog, and she couldn’t resist sharing it with me. And, I, in turn, wish to ask you this simple question: Why did you choose your career?

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  • Independent Inventors Conference

    Attention independent inventors! For two days, independent inventors and small business owners will have an unparalleled opportunity to learn, network, and jumpstart their creative endeavors. Experts and senior officials from the USPTO will present valuable information on patents, trademarks, and other intellectual property (IP) matters while successful business owners and inventors will relate their inspiring … Continue reading Independent Inventors Conference

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  • Interview with Fred Chu, the Kung Fu Medical Student

    Meet Frederick Chu, a man with a healthy fascination for the things that make us unhealthy. Ask him about bacterium, virii, or prions, and you’re likely going to get a very animated version of a biology text book mixed with some horror stories of just how ugly it can get — or even quite a bit about kung fu and various aspects of Asian history.

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  • Updates galore!

    Welcome to Insanitek Ink, the new division of Insanitek. With the new division comes a new look and a new, streamlined community forum!

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  • Motivational Mondays {29.July.2013}

    Sometimes when juggling all the ins and outs of starting a business, then keeping it running like a well oiled machine, we forget who we are. Remember George Soros, Hungarian-American business magnate, investor, and philanthropist, wise words: Well, you know, I was a human being before I became a businessman. We are all human before … Continue reading Motivational Mondays {29.July.2013}

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  • Interview with Karen Lange, a homeschooling guru, freelance writer, author and mentor

    I’ve had the pleasure of talking with Karen Lange, a veteran of the homeschooling community, about her new book Homeschool Co-ops 101. Karen is an amazing woman that, together with her family, has had 16+ years of homeschooling her own children, as well as serving as a support group coordinator and consultant for a New … Continue reading Interview with Karen Lange, a homeschooling guru, freelance writer, author and mentor

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  • Reminder: One week left to get free environmental articles

    Taylor and Francis sent me an email reminding us all that there is only one week left to get free access and copies of some environmental articles to celebrate World Environment Day. So, click on the image for your access pass.

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  • We now accept credit cards!

    OK, it’s been a long time in coming, but we finally have the store set up to take credit cards. This is great news because it means that we can accept more payment options from customers and get the merchant their money quicker. Granted, there are a few things we’re still working on, like getting … Continue reading We now accept credit cards!

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  • Motivational Mondays {15.July.2013}

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  • Science and SciLifeLab Competition

    As a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences (AAAS), I occasionally get an email that I just know the rest of you will be interested in. I recently received an email with the following essay competition for a $25,000 grand prize.

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  • More free from Taylor and Francis

    Taylor and Francis are celebrating their new journal Chinese Journal of Population Resources and Environment with giving away free access to the first issue! Take a look at the table of contents and download them all!

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  • Insanitek updates {11.July.2013}

    Hello, Insanitekians! I know the update is coming at an off time of month, but it’s been rather quiet around here, so I thought to explain why.

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  • Motivational Mondays {8.July.2013}

    Success in business requires training and discipline and hard work. But if you’re not frightened by these things, the opportunities are just as great today as they ever were. – David Rockefeller

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  • Adverts are coming!

    Now, don’t groan. We all hate adverts because they are often obnoxious, not useful, and tasteless. That’s why we decided to use Project Wonderful and a “contact us” to purchase the space. We want the adverts here to be relevant to you, not tacky, and most of all, useful!

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  • Motivational Mondays {1.July.2013}

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  • Deep Dyve

    For those of us that do a lot of research and writing for technical companies, it’s useful to have access to academic journals. However, subscriptions to academic journals cost a small fortune. (Coincidentally, it’s also the reason we try to post all the links to free journals we come across.) How, then, can you elevate … Continue reading Deep Dyve

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  • Financial Friday– Business pitches to venture capalists

    Eventually you’re going to have to pitch your business idea at someone. It’s not easy to do this, and you’re likely going to have to keep trying, refining your pitch every time. To make matters worse, you’re likely going to have to do the infamous “elevator pitch”, which means you have to convince them to … Continue reading Financial Friday– Business pitches to venture capalists

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  • Iced Mocha Recipe

    There are lots of things you can do with leftover coffee. But, leftover coffee in the labs and offices are a different matter. You don’t exactly have a lot of space to work with, nor an oven. What you likely have is a refrigerator and a desk to work with. Keeping these constraints in mind, … Continue reading Iced Mocha Recipe

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  • An Interview with Edward Kim, a Nanoscientist, Physicist, and Science Geek

    Edward Kim, or Eddie, is an undergraduate at University of Guelph — that’s in Canada, for those of you that don’t know. Eddie is studying nanoscience, and is minoring in physics. He hasn’t always been in nanosciences, or even physics. In fact, Eddie has a passion and love of just about every science, and loves … Continue reading An Interview with Edward Kim, a Nanoscientist, Physicist, and Science Geek

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  • Motivational Mondays {24.June.2013}

    Part of being an inventor, and innovator, and a self-starter is marketing yourself to fit your ideas and self into a job. So, we are going to take a slight step back today for our Motivational Monday piece to share a free webinar on how to get employed after you’ve been out of the loop … Continue reading Motivational Mondays {24.June.2013}

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  • More testing ahead

    In order to make it easier for some people to respond to blog posts, we are temporarily changing the status of forum members from “Spectator” to “Participant”. This change may be permanent, but then again, may not. We are looking to see what the spam content would be like if we did this. Hopefully, not … Continue reading More testing ahead

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  • Insanitek updates {20.June.2013}

    There are lots of exciting things happening around here at Insanitek. In fact there are so many things our Fearless Leader is having a hard time keeping up with them and us as we implement them. Here’s what’s new:

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  • This is an arlima test

    Testing Arlima article listing. Please stand by. 😉

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  • Possible breaking of community site ahead

    Ladies and gentlemen, stand back. I’m learning how to programme, and I’m aiming to update the community pages to be what I want. I may break something very, very hard. I do apologise if I kill the community for a bit. 🙂 — Grace

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  • Motivation Monday — Focus

    A cheery little infographic I found describing one of the ways to focus. What do you do to focus?

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  • How we’re making money

    Sometimes little kids can be the most perceptive when it comes to business, and they don’t even know it. While I was talking with some of the kids at the school about what I do, and the company, one kid asked, “So, if you help people for cheap or free, how do you make money?”

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  • Nearly ready!

    I am excited, and here is why:

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  • Motivational Mondays {10.June.2013}

    I don’t think I’ve ever properly introduced myself here. My name is Alesi, and I’m a networking addict. I’ve always loved hearing people’s stories and connecting them to things they need to succeed. So, I went to school for marketing. I decided to do public relations (PR) and networking as my own business so I … Continue reading Motivational Mondays {10.June.2013}

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  • Financial Fridays: Advice from Jon Oringer on venture capitalists

    I found this gem on LinkedIn, by Jon Oringer, the CEO of Shutterstock. In this article, Oringer tells us to struggle to make things work without venture capitalists for as long as possible. Just a note: If you don’t have an account, you really should sign up for a free one. There is a lot … Continue reading Financial Fridays: Advice from Jon Oringer on venture capitalists

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  • In memorandum: Garfield, the Turkey Cat

    First off, I’d like to apologise for there being no updates here on the blog lately. When you hear why, you’ll understand. Let me tell you the story of Garfield, lovingly called Turkey for his initial round shape.

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  • Dontations, if you please

    Starting up a business is difficult. We’re doing it now, and we thought we had everything under control. So, we really do understand where you’re coming from. For that reason, we want to start a weekly post on Friday’s we can call “Financial Fridays”. It’s aimed to offer some business advice — mostly financial, and … Continue reading Dontations, if you please

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  • New to the store

    A few months ago, Grace approached Gabbie of Gabrielle’s Creations for a holiday Etsy trade. After all, with scrumptious jewellery like this, wouldn’t you find a reason to wear it?   With Gabbie’s request, Grace opened the food science section of the store, and went nuts creating stock. Most of the items aren’t quite up … Continue reading New to the store

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  • Maker Camp

    Make Magazine is holding their Make Camp again, and this time it’s going to be on Google+. It’s going to be from July 8th to August 16th, FREE, and fun. While it’s designed for teens, I’m pretty sure big and little “teens” can also get in on the action. For those of you that are … Continue reading Maker Camp

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  • A little note

    Things are squaring away here at Insanitek, and soon we’ll have the ability to talk budgets and actually hiring people. The first round of hirings will go to people that will help increase the website potential and/or the store. What does this mean? It means that freelance writers, DIY’ers, and merchants. See our careers page … Continue reading A little note

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  • Motivation Monday: Minimalist problem solving

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  • Updates and updating

    There are a couple updates that are going on right now within Insanitek’s community that you ought to know about. Dreamhost, the server, has routinely been having issues. This causes the whole of Insanitek to go down for periods of time. We have no control over this, but we do apologise for the inconvenience and … Continue reading Updates and updating

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  • 2nd International Fascination of Plants Day

    Interestingly enough, today is the 2nd International Fascination of Plants Day. To celebrate, Taylor and Francis is granting free access — for today only — of relevant articles. Enjoy the free access while it lasts! Oh, and of particular interest is this article on the deforestation of ancient Turkey. You should recognise a name in … Continue reading 2nd International Fascination of Plants Day

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  • Free enironmental articles from Taylor and Francis

    Early today I received an email that made my day a lot lighter. FREE ACCESS to Influential Articles from Environmental Communication… To give you a taste of the content in Environmental Communication the Editors have highlighted a selection of influential articles to aid your research. These articles reflect themes and ideas that have recently been in … Continue reading Free enironmental articles from Taylor and Francis

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  • Awaken your inner caveman

    One of our network has changed their URL and website all together. They changed from www.flintstonetools.com to www.buystonetools.org. If you go to Flint Stone Tools, you’ll find that you are going to a completely different website that doesn’t reference the old website at all. We have received more than a couple notes that it looks … Continue reading Awaken your inner caveman

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  • The good, the bad, and the apology

    I need to tell you all a little tale about what happens when they let me free to clean up things on the forums and behind the scenes. This, of course, comes with a confession about how OCD on organised and clean I like things to be. Well, I’m a little OCD on having things … Continue reading The good, the bad, and the apology

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  • Adam Savage on the Maker Movement, Etsy, and the Scientific Method

    Mythbuster’s Adam Savage recently met up with Tested and discussed his views on Etsy, the indie market, and what it takes to be a curiosity driven scientist. From their description: In this week’s super-sized episode, Adam answers questions submitted by Etsy users, including how he finds the best stuff on Etsy, how the indie crafts … Continue reading Adam Savage on the Maker Movement, Etsy, and the Scientific Method

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  • Another chance for innovators!

    Eye50’s contest deadline is in two days! What is Eye50? It’s a creative conference that explores the relationship between commerce and creativity, and its potential to redefine business. They say: Prove to us you’ve got an idea in action. Prove to us your idea is solving problems in an innovative manner. Prove to us it … Continue reading Another chance for innovators!

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  • Darpa is looking for you

    Insanitekians, Darpa is looking for you. They need someone to create an advanced cathode ray. You gonna answer that call?

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  • On sale during May, 2013

    On sale this month only is the candy coloured textured stroller blanket and matching hat. This set is was designed to use texture and colour to arouse the curiosity in a baby as you push them along. With the soft textures keeping baby interested for a time, you might even have a moment of reflection … Continue reading On sale during May, 2013

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  • 25 piece stone tool set

    This is a representative set of 25 tools for the Museums. It is priced at $2500 net.  As you can see the tools are of a very high level of quality and represent over 1.5 million years of stone age tool technology from Pebble stone technology (the most primitive tools) through Neanderthal, and Cro-Magnon tools. … Continue reading 25 piece stone tool set

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  • Forum experiments

    You may see some things appear, then disappear from the community and forum over the next few days. We are experimenting with a few WordPress plugins to make the community experience here at Insanitek everything it can and should be. If you’re around and active when we initiate a feature you like, speak up. We … Continue reading Forum experiments

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  • Free physics books

    Frederick Chu recently submitted a wonderful link on Insanitek’s Facebook page that allows you to find free physics books and documents. But, that’s not all this site has. They also have videos, blog commentaries, and lectures as well. Interested? Of course you are since it’s science and it’s free. Take a while to browse through … Continue reading Free physics books

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  • On basic science

    Remember the days when you were young and you’d endlessly annoy your parents with the innocent questions? Why is the sky blue? Why do we sneeze? Where to bees go? Who? What? Why? Where? When? How? These questions, while they may seem simple, can be quite complex. You never know what you’ll find, what lessons … Continue reading On basic science

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  • Updates a-coming

    With Insanitek becoming a bonafide, tax-paying entity, there are some, OK a lot, of changes that need to happen. Some things on the list we’re updating: Front page news and greeting corner Store redo — from pictures, listings, check out cart, and possibly even a new store all together if necessary Updates to the community … Continue reading Updates a-coming

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  • Mini Oreos are coming soon to the store [food science]

    Grace has been at the yarn again, and this time she created little mini Oreos for the Food Science section of the store. You can use them as appliqués, sew ’em on to stuff, set them out in a dish to torment a dieter, give them to kids for play food, or if you wanted … Continue reading Mini Oreos are coming soon to the store [food science]

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  • Open Access on Taylor and Francis

    Everyone loves free stuff. It’s just a fact of life. However, we’ve often discovered that free and quality have inverse proportions. Not this. Taylor and Francis and Routledge Press are high calibre academic journals, and offer free open access journals. The journals they have on open access ARE peer reviewed to keep up the standard … Continue reading Open Access on Taylor and Francis

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  • More dirt on the boss

    Many of you rarely get a behind the scenes look at the puppet master of an operation, so I thought it might be fun (and sometimes funny) to share a little tidbits about myself as they happen to pop up and someone captures it on camera. No, I’m not camera shy, but the stuff I … Continue reading More dirt on the boss

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  • New business partner: Flint Stone Tools

    We are happy to announce that Insanitek is now partnered up with Flint Stone Tools, supplier of authentic and high quality stone tools at affordable prices. So, what do you do with a stone tool? Well, these stone tools are great for museum pieces, but they are also great teaching tools. To make the deal … Continue reading New business partner: Flint Stone Tools

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  • Save Yourself from Aches, Pains & Injuries

    Save Yourself from Aches, Pains & Injuries is a great blog that we just stumbled across while looking for some decent, reliable info on chronic pains in the feet. We found that, and oh so much more. This really is a wealth of information that we can use to help our employees to be healthier … Continue reading Save Yourself from Aches, Pains & Injuries

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  • Neanderthals

    Neanderthals have gone from being feared as brutal cavemen to romanticised as the ancestors we lost. The views on what Neanderthals might have looked like over the years has changed dramatically from the club-dragging brute to something finally more akin to human. However we might speculate on their looks, there are several things we know … Continue reading Neanderthals

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  • Sailor Moon pattern update

    Grace has informed us by slinging pictures our way that Sailor Mercury has been added to the “finished” queue, and that part of the pattern has been checked. While it’s not looking like she’ll get all the dolls done so you can see what the pattern is supposed to yield by the end of April, … Continue reading Sailor Moon pattern update

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  • Smarter Every Day

    Admittedly, I have a new addiction. It’s a YouTube Channel called Smarter Every Day. Check out this awesome presentation on Prince Rupert’s Drop, a physical property of glass that’s essentially cooled very quickly.

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  • Meeting notes: How to make sun tea the Insanitekian way

    Warm weather means fun outside, and for those of us that are a little more traditional, it also brings sun tea. Now, you could do this in a traditional way: in a specialised container with a spout and lid. There is nothing wrong with this way. In fact, it’s probably the easiest way to get … Continue reading Meeting notes: How to make sun tea the Insanitekian way

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  • R&D awards

    If you have an innovation you think is special, why not enter it into the annual R&D awards? This award recognises and celebrates the top 100 technology innovations of the year. Called the “Oscars of Innovation”, the R&D 100 Awards recognizes and celebrates the top 100 technology products of the year. Past winners have included … Continue reading R&D awards

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  • Insanitek’s startup is nice and slow

    And this is just the way I like it. So far since I’ve dreamed up Insanitek, I’ve gone through many iterations of what it ought to be. Except, I shouldn’t have been listening necessarily to what it ought to be, but to what it wanted to be and what I’m capable of pulling off for … Continue reading Insanitek’s startup is nice and slow

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  • Sailor Moon Pattern Giveaway

    Over Christmas, a special client requested that Grace make a Sailor Moon doll for a trade. It’s been a huge hit on Etsy so far. So much so, that Grace had a special request come in for 6 dolls from the Sailor Moon cast. While working on this order, Grace has been updating the first … Continue reading Sailor Moon Pattern Giveaway

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  • Insanitek on Pinterest

    Or is it Pinterest on Insanitek…. No matter. What does matter is that now there is a Pinterest button here on the website so you can share your finds across the Pinterest world. Stay tuned for more changes! We’re working hard to make this everything it should be.

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  • 2013 Spring Collection for charity bows

    As discussed in a previous post, we started to make special editions that will first be sold in the Insanitek store. Next year, whatever is left, will be sold in the Etsy store. So, for a full year you lucky Insanitekians get first dibs on the exclusive and rare “Spring 2013” collection for bows. After … Continue reading 2013 Spring Collection for charity bows

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  • Spring 2013’s limited edition item

    Over on Etsy, little hair bows are selling like crazy. Reason? Probably because they are cheap, cute, and they are for charity. People can use them as is, or take the pin off and sew it onto other things for decoration. They can even horde them and resell them if they wanted. Well, we’re going … Continue reading Spring 2013’s limited edition item

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  • New JSTOR feature

    JSTOR, the journal repository site, has added a new, very awesome feature. You can now sign up for a personal account that will allow you to access articles for free. Now, it could be better. They allow you to put 3 individual items on your shelf, and after 14 days, remove them. You can’t have … Continue reading New JSTOR feature

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  • Textured stroller blanket and matching hat increase visual and sensory stimulation for baby

    Everyone knows that babies need stimulation and protection against the chill when out and about. So, here at Insanitek we’ve made a candy-coloured stroller blanket with matching hat. Both items are soft, but lightly textured to give Baby something to touch and cuddle with while being kept warm and snuggled in. We choose to make it … Continue reading Textured stroller blanket and matching hat increase visual and sensory stimulation for baby

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  • Cause and effect: increased taxes means inflation of everything else

    I am self employed, and I run my own company. Granted, I am a company of one with the intentions to hire more as I can afford to. However, this dream has been slightly derailed due to increases in taxes required by the government to pay for everyone else’s healthcare (not mine since I can’t even … Continue reading Cause and effect: increased taxes means inflation of everything else

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  • Insanitek’s Affiliate Program

    We have initiated an affiliate program for Insanitek in hopes to give a little added benefit to those that work with us. Affiliate accounts are given to special people that contribute to Insanitek in some way. These include: Writers Editors Artists Technicians Engineers Tinkerers Dedicated fans Giving you an affiliate account is a simple, effective … Continue reading Insanitek’s Affiliate Program

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  • January updates

    The community is now working as intended, so members are welcome to join in on the conversations. Now, the crew is going to focus on making the store 100% functional and science articles that will be published here on Insanitek communities.

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  • Little Robot on Listia

    The Little Robot which has been a very popular kids toy is being given away as a Listia auction with free shipping! The Little Robot in green, yellow and grey is being given away on Lisita. If you’re not a member of Lisita yet, join here. If you are, follow this link to get to … Continue reading Little Robot on Listia

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  • New year and new beginnings

    Well, as it stands there are new beginnings all the time. However, it’s always nice to have a solid defining point. The beginning of the western New Year is good enough for us to pinpoint, and thus make a good discussion of “new beginnings” here on Insanitek. First off, and it’s no secret, that the … Continue reading New year and new beginnings

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  • What to look forward to in January

    As a collective, we’ve decided that offering free brooch pins with certain purchases would be a Good Thing. So, after the busy holiday, our fearless captain Grace has been slated to create a whole slew of new brooches. They will be sold individually for charity, as normal, but those who buy shawls, sweaters and purses/bags … Continue reading What to look forward to in January

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  • Pi Beret/Slouch hats

    We are proud to say that we have sold out of the Pi Beret/Slouch hats earlier today. However, there are more in the making! There will be another blue and red one, just like before. However, we want your input! What colours would you like to see in the Pi hat?  Leave your vote in … Continue reading Pi Beret/Slouch hats

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  • Items being auctioned off

    For the holidays, we are cleaning up our overstock and auctioning them off. The auctions in progress are for a beautiful lacy shawl, a felted purse, decorative garden snail, and a crocheted women’s sweater. Later on today we’ll be adding a pair of the Mama Jane Slippers that we sell for charity. Interested in joining … Continue reading Items being auctioned off

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  • New additions to the store

    In case you haven’t been to our store lately, we now have slippers for charity up in the store. 100% of all proceeds from these slipper sales will go to Doctors Without Borders. We are still working on getting credit card acceptance set up. Until then, it is standard PayPal only. Trust us, we’re just … Continue reading New additions to the store

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  • Welcome to the new and improved Insanitek Community!

    We are changing things up a bit here on Insanitek. First, we are redoing the store, and now we are redoing the community. Be patient with us while we get used to the new layout and surroundings, please. If you have any suggestions, comments, or questions please comment. We welcome your thoughts.

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